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The Sweet Track (Megalithic)
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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I must remember that "Differential Erosion" phrase next time I bump into an English Heritage geologist.

It might even be the same one that talked about the stones at Avebury being made of "concreted alluvial silicate deposits". Ordinary people call that concrete.

Our local English Heritage experts are still excited that they've (only just) found where loads of the Stonehenge stones came from. Near West Woods (near Marlborough).

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-53580339

Some might say it would be churlish to spoil their party atmosphere by demanding an explanation of how the stones were moved up and down the steep hills in between.

Perhaps it was Differential Erosion?
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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St Michael's Mount wrote:
Bronze Age Hoard
16 August 2016


In 2009 our Assistant Head Gardener, Darren Little came across something quite unusual when clearing away some bracken from the North Westerly slopes of the Island's garden. Darren discovered a small axe head hidden within a cavity in some rocks. Upon further inspection, a total of 48 artefacts were discovered, including blade fragments, a buckle, a chape and various ingot fragments.




The Mount, managed by the National Trust and the St Aubyn family, has had "surprisingly little archaeological work" not to mention "little original historical research" carried out so this lot from the back end of the garden is a biggie. Actually, shockingly rather than surprisingly -- no archaeological work has ever been done on St Michael's Mount, in contrast to its sister site across La Manche.

Presumably the ingots are tin, it's not stated, but anyway how have archaeologists interpreted the collection?

The finds were sent to the Royal Albert Memorial Museum for x-rays, cleaning, and inspection. It was then verified by the British Museum that the artefacts dated from the late Bronze Age, making them around three thousand years old. Whilst we know the age of these historic items, it is unclear as to how they came to be on The Mount. It is assumed that they belonged to a Blacksmith who used the cavity as storage, to keep the hoard hidden from potential thieves.

I suppose there could have been a smithy though the Mount's not perhaps a particularly suitable location. Tin horse shoes, anyone?

The discovery of the Bronze Age Hoard provides a link between St Michaels Mount and the manufacture of artefacts from this period. The most significant item in the hoard is a buckle, possibly a scabbard decoration, which is thought to be unique, as no other buckle of its design has been found in Great Britain.

https://www.stmichaelsmount.co.uk/blog/bronze-age-hoard

It looks rather like a belt buckle, possibly valuable, but just as likely to have been accidentally fallen into the crevices between the rocks rather than intentionally hidden.
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