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The Sweet Track (Megalithic)
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Mick Harper
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A fellow researcher is visiting Cadiz and is open to doing a spot of digging. With his camera. We're all agreed Cadiz is a hotspot but we;'ve never discovered quite why or how. Get those little brain cells working and as Tony used to say, 'We've only got three days.to do it. Maybe more, depends on the crew and the weather. And the producer's drink problem.'
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Mick Harper
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My Glastonbury lecture continues to divide the critics

Ron Burcham 23 hours ago

Bullshit
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Mick Harper
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A major theme of the Glastonbury lecture is the 'Venus Pool', large tidal pools which are a) incredibly rare and b) always 'natural' according to archaeologists and geologists. We say different. Here's the latest, in the Arran Islands, a prime spot for ancient navigation on the western seaboard of Europe.



This is a remarkable feature and a major attraction for the visitor. It is a natural rectangular shaped pool into which the sea ebbs and flow at the bottom of the cliffs south of Dún Aonghasa on Inis Mór. Access to it is gained by walking east along the cliffs from Dún Aonghasa or more easily by following the signs from the village of Gort na gCapall.

You'll have to decide whether you agree with the Official Guide but, on the other hand, it sure don't look like any Venus Pool we've listed so far.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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It looks like this one had a lid!
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Mick Harper
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Well, you've gnomically identified the problem. It is far too geometrically regular to be natural but far too geometrically regular to be a cormorant pool either. The obvious solution is to suppose, as the official text suggests, that it is a tourist attraction, except there is no chance that such a thing would be designed for tourists. Both the Venus Pools I am familiar with, on Lihou Island and Little Sark, have been minimally adapted for tourist swimming purposes (as was the one on Burgh Island) but, again, there seems no chance of that here since it would be a major investment in very recent times. Now clearly it has to some extent been made tourist-friendly but why make it rectangular when the whole point is to present it as a natural wonder!

Of course a striking shape would be beneficial to cormorants trying to find it but then why aren't the others? I remain mystified.
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Andreas



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My advice to your researcher is to do some very easy and basic research. Bring up www.floodmap.net for Cadiz, then increase the sea level to the period of history they are interested in. Very quickly they will note that the Island is deep under water, so anything from before Roman times may not be seen where one might expect it. Then focus on the areas which is above water; otherwise you are wasting your time. If they really do their work they will find the Hypogeum; but it is difficult to get to!!
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Mick Harper
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Welcome, Andreas. Posts are made at great intervals and everyone treats threads as sequential (not clustered) so it is necessary for you to quote whatever it is you are replying to (unless it's the last one), since otherwise nobody would know what it was. I assume it was this

A fellow researcher is visiting Cadiz and is open to doing a spot of digging. With his camera. We're all agreed Cadiz is a hotspot but we've never discovered quite why or how. Get those little brain cells working and as Tony used to say, 'We've only got three days.to do it. Maybe more, depends on the crew and the weather. And the producer's drink problem.'

I don't think anyone here knows what a hypogeum is and will probably disagree with you when you tell us.
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Mick Harper
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We are always on the lookout for artificial intrusions that everyone else says are natural, in megalithically-significant places, eg Balos at the northwestern-most corner of Crete, facing the Peloponnese. See anything you fancy? The causeway, by the by, is constructed using what geologists are pleased to call natural cement.

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Wile E. Coyote


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Balos............


Ballast..........

Ships Ballast.
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Mick Harper
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I raise this important point in my Glastonbury lecture (since nobody else ever does). When transporting heavy materials from A to B there is no guarantee that B will have heavy materials required in A. Therefore ballast will be needed for the return journey. This ballast will essentially be shipped free of charge from B to A. Therefore everybody will be on the lookout for material in B that may not be needed in A but if it's going to arrive anyway ... what the hell.

In my lecture, I show this to be granite blocks in the case of the Western Channel metals trade. We could probably find out what it was in Balos (and some pungent observations on the theory itself) from our Shipping Correspondent, Boreades, but he's doing a Donald Crowhurst re-enactment at the moment.
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