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Forgery: Modus operandi (British History)
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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The Dering Roll

Tracking the Green Knight I came across this bit of forgery. The Dering Roll is the oldest (ahem) English roll of arms surviving in its original form. It is made according to wiki between 1270 and 1280.

It's a parchment roll consisting of 4 sheets stitched together, and shows 324 coats-of-arms of the knights owing feudal service to the constable of Dover Castle. The parchment is named after the noted antiquarian Sir Edward Dering (1598—1644), who was Lieutenant of Dover Castle. Whilst it was in his possession, entry number 61, Nicholas de Criol, was changed to that of.......the fictitious Richard FitzDering and the de Criol shield replaced.

So, it is thought, Sir Edward created himself a (Fitz)Dering ancestor.

I am struggling to find any provenance before Dering....It's about 100 years older than the next parchment, and about 300 years older than the majority. CCC conventional christian chronology.
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Mick Harper
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Good spot. Ordinarily we would eagle onto

Whilst it was in his possession, entry number 61, Nicholas de Criol, was changed to that of.......the fictitious Richard FitzDering and the de Criol shield replaced. So, it is thought, Sir Edward created himself a (Fitz)Dering ancestor.

and conclude that Sir Edward had it made in order to give himself a pedigree. However this seems doubtful because (a) he wouldn't need a clumsy emendation when he would have just instructed the forger to include a FitzDering coat of arms from the off (b) it seems an awful lot of work just to acquire a distant ancestor. But our next port of call (c) to make a bit of dosh selling a priceless artefact of English heritage, seems unlikely too since he wouldn't jeopardise prospects by clumsy emendations.

Yet we do have some striking coincidences to hand: (a) a noted antiquarian discovering a noted antiquity, they usually have to buy them (b) a Lieutenant of Dover Castle discovering a parchment roll pertaining to Dover Castle, they are usually in pride of place. Of course it will be argued that, as per usual, it is the most natural thing in the world that an antiquarian finding himself in charge of Dover Castle would find in the long neglected archives ("First left past the dungeons, Eddie") an antiquity pertaining to Dover Castle. Cometh the hour, cometh the man. But too many world records for that. Dig on!
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Mick Harper
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Oh, all right, I will. He may be said to be born to be Lieutenant of Dover Castle since he was born in the Tower of London where his father was the deputy-lieutenant. So it is told in the ancient scriptures. Be that as it may he quickly got down to his true calling, collecting antiques

According to an entry in his account book, he purchased two copies of William Shakespeare's First Folio on 5 December 1623: this is the earliest recorded retail purchase of this famous book.

So it is told in the ancient provenances of Bond Street dealers. These account books have a funny habit of surviving the ages. And don't forget it's the earliest retail purchase: "Put another world record on the table, Mabel!" After three years his first wife died so he married the daughter of one of our all-time faves

Dering subsequently married Anne, daughter of Sir John Ashburnham.

Welcome to the family firm, my boy. It gets worse... or better, as we prefer to call it.
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Hatty
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The papers of Sir Edward Dering of Surrenden Dering, Kent, were preserved in the Surrenden library but most of the collection, including deeds and 'valuable manuscripts' that he had transcribed, were reportedly 'dispersed' after his death in 1644.

If one is to believe Dering's own words the family's roots went back to pre-Conquest times. He boasted that one ancestor fell with Harold at the Battle of Hastings, that another was killed at the Battle of Bosworth and that yet another circumnavigated the globe with Sir Francis Drake. His great-uncle was the well-known preacher, Edward Dering (1540-1576), a distantly related cousin, Richard Dering (1580-1630), the organist to Queen Henrietta Maria.

It sounds like the Dering land holdings needed to be legitimised. Edward Dering himself changed sides in the Civil War but his property had been requisitioned and destroyed four times by Parliamentarians by 1642. 'Fitz' might have been an antiquarian's touch to show the Dering family owned the estate in the Norman era


According to an entry in his account book, he purchased two copies of William Shakespeare's First Folio on 5 December 1623: this is the earliest recorded retail purchase of this famous book.


Edward Dering holds two other Shakespeare-related world records -- the owner of the earliest known manuscript copy of a Shakespeare play and he organised the first documented amateur performance of a Shakespeare play

The Dering Manuscript is the earliest extant manuscript text of any play by William Shakespeare.

Scholarly consensus indicates that the manuscript was revised in the early 17th century by Sir Edward Dering, a man known for his interest in literature and theater. Dering prepared his redaction for an amateur performance starring friends and family at Surrenden Manor, Kent, where the manuscript was discovered in 1844. This is the earliest known instance of an amateur production of Shakespeare in England
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Mick Harper
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He gets interestinger and interestinger.
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Mick Harper
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Paul Halsall @PaulBHalsall
For quite some time though, there has been a "relic bank" in Rome run by the nuns at Santa Lucia in Selci. I suppose it still serves new churches, but until 1994 if you had a letter from your parish priest, individuals could get a relic (in a theca + with papers) there.

Dr Francis Young@DrFrancisYoung
I'm really starting to regret now that I've never attempted to obtain a relic; there was a time when you could buy reliquaries at French flea markets that sometimes contained relics. Although purchase was arguably both uncanonical and unethical
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Mick Harper
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One of the incidental pleasures of knowing more about forgery than any other person in the known universe (yes, Hatty) is that you can read a paper like

What is the Enlightenment? Investigating the Origins and Ideological Uses of an Historical Category

and cackle away as all those towering intellectual figures earnestly pose and dispose of ideas about things that never existed in the first place. It's like being there when they discussed how many angels could dance on the head of a pin. Not (probably) that that ever happened either.
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Ishmael


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Mick Harper wrote:
It's like being there when they discussed how many angels could dance on the head of a pin. Not (probably) that that ever happened either.


Wait until you realize that all of British History is a fraud.
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Mick Harper
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If you spent less time telling us it's coming it might arrive.
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Ishmael


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The catalog of evidences is so vast I have trouble grasping it all intellectually myself. However, once I'm through my current crop of history books I'm going to go back to the beginning and re-read for the third time from the Roman Invasions to Victoria. I will then post my observations as I encounter them, just as notes. I can't possibly yet begin to shape this material into a cogent argument.

I will tell you this. I am largely convinced that British History--and the history of Europe in general--was written in the wake of Waterloo. Prior to the 19th century, Britain had no history.

The question then arises as to why it suddenly became so important to write a history.

I believe that Napoleon is the answer. And that suggests everything we've been told about him is a lie.

Given that Napoleon's history is a lie, what might the truth be that the lie was created to conceal?

I can conceive of only one answer.
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Mick Harper
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At a time.
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Ishmael


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Actually not true. I've long been aware of my innate ability to entertain contradictory hypotheses, believing any one of them with conviction when appropriate. I've only honed this skill under your tutelage.

In that light, I overstated the case in my previous post. Let's try again.

There is one explanation for the falsification of history following the defeat of Napoleon that appears to me more explanatory than any other I have yet conceived. That explanation also strikes me as the most obvious explanation.
  • Given: History was falsified.
  • Given: History was falsified in the wake of the challenge of
  • Napoleon.
  • Conclusion: Something about Napoleon was/had-to-be falsified.
What about Napoleon could be so pivotal and destabilizing that it would demand the creation of 2000 years of phony history to conceal?

Dismissing all that you "know" about Napoleon, what is the immediately obvious answer to this question?
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Mick Harper
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Well, he did emphasise his Merovingian links eg by covering his imperial coronation gear with bees. Then he refused to allow the Pope, imported at great expense by negotiating the Concordat and returning France to Catholicism, to crown him. But I have a feeling I am not getting close to either of your great minds.
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Mick Harper
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Kevin Wilbraham Retweeted a photo from Purpura
Gilded copper coin of Leo IV from 780 CE is the very last coin of a Roman Emperor minted in Rome https://pic.twitter.com/bXDSfgKFwR

They just lie down and say, "Ravish me."
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Mick Harper
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Everybody concentrates on the forger and the forged product but seldom is the third element in the transaction, the purchaser, given much attention. This is not a zero sum game, a battle of wits between equals. If it were, the forgery would be exposed virtually all the time -- they are not, as a general rule, hard to spot. The reason that forgeries are successful most of the time is for two reasons:

1. The forger goes to great lengths to ensure that the product is not of the “is it, isn’t it?” variety but of the “is it worth that much, or that much?” variety.
2. The purchaser either knows it is a forgery or doesn’t much care whether it is or it isn’t. It is a win-win transaction and the only loser is not privy to the deal.

I will describe both situations in succession because they resonate but they never occur together.
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