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This Really Makes me Sick! (Health)
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Keimpe


In: Leeuwarden, Frisia
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My mother used to be a registered nurse (she's 79 years old now) and when I was still in primary school we would have conversations like this:

+ Keimpe, what is one-eigth of one-hundred?
- 12.5 mom
+ Oh, I thought it was 25
- Why do you ask?
+ Well, I had to give a patient his medication and the bottle said one-eight of 100 grams
- So you gave someone double his medication?
+ Yes, I guess I did
- Well, shouldn't you call someone?
+ You think so?

So you see, I have had formal training in not relying on authority. She did always call in the end though (but only because I kept telling her to do so).
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Pff! I was much more lethal than your mum, Keimpe. I killed someone my first day working at a hospital. One of my duties was to operate the cardiac arrest alert system, and was shown how to do it. But I couldn't be permitted to actually practise doing it because that would have meant dozens of doctors-and-nurses being woken from their beds and charging around with fibulator trolleys and stuff.

So the first time someone phoned in with a 333 I went through the procedure as best I could remember it. And nothing happened. This didn't worry me particularly as I had no idea what does happen when a cardiac arrest alert happens.

After about ten minutes I got another call. "You remember that Cardiac alert call I made? Well, you might as well cancel it...the bloke's dead." Fortunately this was before people knew you could sue the NHS for negligence so no harm done.

The way I would put it (now) are that hospitals really are centres-of-excellence but that centres-of-excellence are not all they are cracked up to be.
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Bronwyn



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Vitamin B12 and early man.

From an AE angle, I've had an "Aha" moment.
It is known that early man did not manage to live to old age, we've touched on the subject here before. This new finding on the documented DNA repair ability of a combination of Vitamin B12 (not found in fish, white meats,or game nor any milk or cheese products, nor any soy or other grain products) & Folic Acid (Vitamin B9,found in citrus juices, whole grains, green leafy vegetables,poultry, pork & liver)could be the reason for the early demise of ancient man. Those who ate grasses & seeds would be deficient in B12, as would those who were Known as the fish eaters. Old age could never have occurred until man joined the two diets together. When the hunter also became the gatherer of grain seeds and berries , then would the key elements to repair DNA and thus live an extended life become a reality?

Once your DNA has run its course and strands begin to mutate you are stuffed.

Here's a link to the B12 info.
http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s1381311.htm
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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When the hunter also became the gatherer of grain seeds and berries , then would the key elements to repair DNA and thus live an extended life become a reality... Once your DNA has run its course and strands begin to mutate you are stuffed.

So if people start to live long enough to reproduce while their DNA strands are in disarray...?

Men, in particular, I presume: the ova are assembled even before birth, aren't they? But sperm are made throughout adult life. But making sperm cells surely means the chromosomes are complete... but if they've been patched up, they're not necessarily faithful copies of the parent DNA?
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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It is known that early man did not manage to live to old age

mmm...not sure about this. Traditional history has been getting this wrong for years -- always going on about how everyone before Our Own Very Wonderful Times had a life that was nasty, brutish and short. But the hyper-modern view is that everybody actually lived the usual three-score-and-ten, once you survived the high levels of infant mortality. Though they've still not come to terms with the fact that people's living standards haven't changed much either now from then i.e. it's pretty OK. (The urge to see ourselves as particularly blessed seems ineradicable among historians, just as seeing ourselves as unavoidably doomed is an idee fixe among radical politicos.)

Now the same might be true of pre-history. And here at least they've got an excuse because the relative paucity of the evidence makes actuarial statistics a bit fraught. But the real question is "How early is early?" The orthodox view is that we were all hunter-gatherers up until the Neolithic Revolution, living on a diet of berries, fruit, honey and the occasional Big Kill, then switched over to cereals.

But my own view is that we started off as pure arctic hunters (cf the Esquimaux), then became near-Arctic herdsmen (cf the Lapps) and then cereal- and farmed animal meat-eaters. This would mean that our diet NEVER included green veg (or any other veg) until very late. And even then these accoutrements were seen as mere garnish, taste extenders and so forth. It's noticeable that even as late as eighteenth century Britain, vegetables were viewed with considerable scepticism by the rank-and-file.

But I do not know what an unvarying diet of seal, fish and reindeer (plus milk) gives you in terms of vitamins, longevity and so forth.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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"How early is early?"

I didn't question this bit because, even though the evidence is that the Neolithic Revolution brought a marked reduction in life-expectancy, I don't think they reckoned the palaeolithics to have lived as long as we routinely do now. (Although I don't know how much "how long we routinely live now" varies.)

What's the correlation of life-expectancy to physical size?

Wadya think of the menopause as an indicator of the "natural" life-expectancy?

PS. Could pure arctic hunting (cf the Esquimaux) ever have been a 'state of nature', given the level of technology required to master that environment?
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4898488.stm

Drug firms 'inventing diseases'

Disease-mongering is putting people at risk, researchers say

Pharmaceutical firms are inventing diseases to sell more drugs, researchers have warned.

Disease-mongering promotes non-existent diseases and exaggerates mild problems to boost profits, the Public Library of Science Medicine reported.

Researchers at Newcastle University in Australia said firms were putting healthy people at risk by medicalising conditions such as menopause.

But the pharmaceutical industry denied it invented diseases.
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Keimpe


In: Leeuwarden, Frisia
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I don't think diseases are actually "invented", but I do think that conditions are matched to new medicines, after which these conditions are given a nice new name (for instance ADHD), which then turns into a "disease" (which usually has no measurable symptoms, but some sort of checklist - this is the REALLY clever bit). Then there's some cleverly targeted publicity and then there's no turning back...

Here's a nice article on ADHD: http://www.nexusmagazine.com/articles/ADHDisbogus.html

(this site is very weird: every single one of its articles is either complete bollocks or very interesting)
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Komorikid


In: Gold Coast, Australia
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This is an excerpt from a book I have recently read. The author is Laurence Gardner - a recent Author of the Month on the Graham Hancock website.

During the course of David Hudson's research concerning Orbitally Rearranged Monatomic Elements (ORME) in the late 90's, the medical fraternity began to take a keen interest in the potential use of ORMEs for cancer treatment. Those involved in the early research were the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the National Cancer Institute, Merck & Co, Rutgers University, the University of Illinois, Wayne State University, The University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Institute of Biotechnology.
Journals such as the Platinum Metal Review and Scientific America had reported how monatomic platinum group metals will resonate with deformed body cells, causing DNA to relax and become corrected. Instead of destroying the tissue with radiation, or killing the immune system with chemotherapy drugs, here was a prospective remedy which actually rectified altered cells. It was not so much 'anti-cancer', but more 'pro-life'. The National Institute of Health implemented a variety of tests on independent cells for all manner of cancer types. From some 58 early studies, it was concluded that ORME application caused a dramatic reduction or cessation in cancer activity. The other analytical centres reported similar results.


This is not a drug and offers a one time cure for many genetic illnesses but as far as I know it has not become available or even widely known that a CURE for cancer exists; something that corrects the wayward cells completely.
Does anyone else know about the properties or the availability of ORME compounds, more commonly know as White Powder Gold.
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Oakey Dokey



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Yes

It's non-crystalline metal. Two or a few atoms of a metal bound together. It has something to do with Cooper pairings but frankly I'm sceptical about such things.

People have been taking it for quite a while now and all sorts of claims have been made about it. Such as it's the fabled 'ambrosia' and the like.

Still worth a closer look but I'd suggest a cautious approach.

It can be readily bought over the internet.

It's even been claimed that in an m-state (mono or diatomic) the metals somehow spontaneously change elemental configuration, the legendary philosopher's stone and alchemy have been mentioned.

Apparently some farmer in the US saw it in his earth and tried to figure out what it was.
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Oakey Dokey



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Regarding ingestion of Ormes from an ORME web site:

WARNING!!

PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED
The following problems have been encountered by some folks who have made m-state for consumption:

Some people have gotten quite sick from consuming m-state made from sea water collected at a marina. This water contained high levels of lead and other contaminants.

Other people have gotten quite sick from consuming m-state materials which were made improperly. These materials were made without the use of pH test paper or meters and the resulting material contained toxic metals. Please remember that old pH paper can become inaccurate.

People have gotten sick from consuming m-state materials which contained bacteria because they were not sterilized or stored properly.

It is possible to bring the pH of your source material up too quickly, especially if you use lye in too high a concentration. This could result in local areas of very high pH within your solution. These high pH areas could allow toxic metals to precipitate and mix with your desired precipitate.

M-state platinum might be considered toxic by some since it makes you quite ill if you consume alcohol. No one has reported this effect from consuming m-state from sea water.

Some people have used Teflon™ coated aluminum sauce pans for heating lye or lye water. The Teflon™ got scratched and the aluminum started dissolving in the lye water producing hydrogen gas which could have exploded. The liquid was contaminated with aluminum which is a poison.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Maybe this is off-topic, but can someone fill me in on this "lye". It turned up in some connection with ancient salt (was it Dan's alum?).
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Oakey Dokey



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Maybe this is off-topic, but can someone fill me in on this "lye". It turned up in some connection with ancient salt (was it Dan's alum?).

It's an old word for alkaline soda (soda lye is sodium hydroxide)

Lye used to be made from wood ash and was an important part of making soap, later it was found that mixing it with rendered fat made glycerin, an important step towards making nitroglycerin (explosive)
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Mick Harper
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Thanks, Oakey, but could you indicate what its role is in cancer treatment? I ask because one of the things that came out of our earlier discussions was that there was some mystery attached to why it was considered so important and...er...mysterious.

"Wood ash" sounds a very common-or-garden ingredient and yet "alum" was said to require "wood ash" to be burnt continuously for a full six months! Apologies if I am getting different things mixed up.
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Oakey Dokey



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I have to regret to inform you that I know of no known use of 'lye' or sodium hydroxide in actual treatment of cancer. In fact it's supposedly a big contributor towards oesophagous cancer.

It is however a common chemical used in the manufacture of certain drugs (often chemicals are not soluble in acid or alkali so it's used to 'crash out the drug' into a solid form in a pH'ed liquid). The drug is often a reaction mixture with many components which only a few will be soluble in either acid or alkali so when placed in it, it will become a solid which can be filtered.

It's a separation technique or a purifying technique. Well as far as I'm aware anyway.
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