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CABINET OF CURIOSITIES (NEW CONCEPTS)
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Wile E. Coyote wrote:
Guys its just a "dark/brown/black colour" as Dan says it come from the black sea.....


Yet in livestock dun indicates a dilution or lightening of the base colour.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Yes it does. Interesting that.
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Or did it originally just mean a duller, less intense version of the base colour?
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Hill... river... dull... shrouded in mist.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Don = Zone.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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I finally broken from that.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Well then you're wrong.

HOWEVER...

There are many many "Zone" words in many languages. They all stem from the same root (though its form is unknown). I use the word "Tzar" to represent the original word. All variations contain the essence of "division". Nevertheless, as every language itself accumulates variations, each variation takes on different connotations and, ultimately, more-specific application.

The word "Don" more than superficially resembles the word "down". The two are the same word spelled differently. So how can this be? Down does not mean "division."

No. But a "down" is a specific kind of division. Down divisions tend to be associated with rivers and valleys -- where the land drops away from its typical elevation.

Tor, as another example, also means "zone." But the form "tor" came to be associated, in several languages, with towers and with towns.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Torah, legal ruling on land/inheritance. Set in stone in some cases.

Taurus. Land to be ploughed or grazed per household is made official by law (cf. medieval papal bulls).

I think tsar is too similar to star to ignore the 'heavenly' aspect. Parcelling out zones of land is most efficient when bearing in mind the orientation and topography of the land?
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Hatty wrote:
I think tsar is too similar to star to ignore the 'heavenly' aspect. Parcelling out zones of land is most efficient when bearing in mind the orientation and topography of the land?


No. I absolutely agree that Star is the same word. Tsar = Star.

What does the link mean? Are stars used to divide the sky into constellations? Or are Tsars, Stars? We still call our elites "superstars" to this day. The association of Stars and Gods and the rulers of Earth's "zones" remains unclear -- but certain.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Sar words

Nearly all "ruled" or "over" "dominance" words "slaughter"

Sar=prince ruler

Sarah= princess

Saracen= Pagan

Sarsen= Pagan

Sarcasm=Sneer

Adversary= Opponent

Disaster=Failure in battle

Serk as in beserk.=frenzy in battle

Cezar

Czar

Tsar

Star

And so on
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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By coincidence I have just received this from one of the doyens of Ancient Lore

The Megalithics, as you call them, used the land as a book of wisdom and wrote their profound knowledge there in a way that would probably last until the end of time. They were highly cosmological people, just like the Normans/Templars and Elizabethans, all steeped in star lore due to their background in navigation and mythology. There is a thread running right through history.

More revelations are promised me which, if I can, I will pass along.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Ishmael wrote:
What does the link mean? Are stars used to divide the sky into constellations? Or are Tsars, Stars? We still call our elites "superstars" to this day. The association of Stars and Gods and the rulers of Earth's "zones" remains unclear -- but certain.

I think you've put it well. Leaders always have some kind of sign linking them to the upper regions even if it's only a crown.

Astrologers divide the sky into twelve 'houses', a system attributed to the Babylonians. That knowledge of the sky is surely not limited to any one people.

Shah is another version of tsar. I like to think, probably wrongly, that there's a connection with shaman, an Eveni word, in that the shaman could 'fly'.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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DPCrisp wrote:
Have we done this one? I don't think so.


The River Severn....

wiki wrote:
The name Severn is thought to derive from a Celtic original name *sabrinn--, of uncertain meaning.[5] That name then developed in different languages to become Sabrina to the Romans, Hafren in Welsh, and Severn in English. A folk etymology later developed, deriving the name from a mythical story of a nymph, Sabrina, who drowned in the river.[6] Sabrina is also the goddess of the River Severn in Brythonic mythology. The story of Sabrina is featured in Milton's Comus.[7] There is a statue of 'Sabrina' in the Dingle Gardens at the Quarry, Shrewsbury. As the Severn becomes tidal the associated deity changed to Noadu (Romanized as Nodens), who was represented mounted on a seahorse, riding on the crest of the Severn bore


Lets try to solve this age old mystery in just one word.

Sever.

Wait I have just received an email for an eminent Finnish palaeontologist.........

Tarmo Huuskonen wrote:
Coyote is just making this up, to suit his own theory


Oh well...
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Lets try to solve this age old mystery in just one word.
Sever.

Quite right. The really great problem the Megalithics found when setting up Avebury as their chief entrepot was that while you can get from anywhere in England to Avebury by overland straight lines, the Bristol Channel/ Severn Estuary/ Seven Bore meant that large parts of Wales were cut off.

So the Perpetual Choirs system was set up to allow Welsh travellers safe overland access to England and vice versa. .
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Tarmo Huuskonen wrote:
Coyote is just making this up, to suit his own theory

I can never understand why this is regarded as an insult. Darwin made up Evolution to suit his own theory. Of course it is true that since there is no science in etymology, Coyote made up Severn=Sever on the same basis ('sounds like') that every other explanation for Severn has been put forward. At least with Coyote-plus-Harper we now have a function to go with the form.

But I have a feeling that etymologists would reject form-and-function explanations as unwarrantably interfering with their own total freedom to make anything up they want. Isn't that right, Sabrina?
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