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CABINET OF CURIOSITIES (NEW CONCEPTS)
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Isles of the silt... to echo my God's Garden essay.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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Coast or summat said the Isles of Scilly have more shipwrecks than anywhere else. Can there be any doubt that Scilly = Scylla?
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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They have the same name. It probably means "dangerous rocks". But was Homer writing about Sicily?

I doubt it.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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Whadya make of the similarity between Cornwall/Scilly and Italy/Sicily?
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Ishmael wrote:
... to echo my God's Garden essay.

Is the essay available? Sounds fruitful.

They have the same name. It probably means "dangerous rocks".

Perhaps a place of opposing tides, the Channel vs the Atlantic, Med vs Adriatic, which would indeed make steering dangerous. Safer to scull (row) than use sail.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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If you use Internet Explorer, you can find it here:

http://www.thequestgroup.org/essay/ash_godsGarden00.htm

I wrote it before I met Mick.

It shows.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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DPCrisp wrote:
Whadya make of the similarity between Cornwall/Scilly and Italy/Sicily?


I give up.

What am I supposed to make of it?

(I know you talked about this before)

And just to remind you, my hobby horse on this is the crazy idea that Homer was an as-yet unidentified 17th century Englishman.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Thanks for the God's Garden link, very impressive so far (and fantastic graphics). No wonder Mick hijacked you.

While mesmerised by your artwork on India it was clear you were dealing with another instance of people making for a wet west coast. In a programme about E-food the other night monosodium glutamate came up, occurring naturally in seaweed before it was marketed as the MSG we know and love today.

Would seaweed be a factor in the desirability (and superiority?) of western over eastern seaboards? Not just making dinner more appetising (and adding some useful body-fat) but perhaps increasing longevity since we know seaweed contains iodine.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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another instance of people making for a wet west coast... Would seaweed be a factor in the desirability (and superiority?) of western over eastern seaboards?

Don't forget that it's eastern seaboards that are more consistently wet: the wet bits of the American Pacific coasts are far north, far south and dead centre, with desert coasts in between. Europe/Africa ditto.

The wet coasts are certainly superior to the dry ones: compare the European and African coasts north and south of the Mediterranean.

But looking for a quote on the ubiquity of seaweeds, I found: "Kelp forests occur worldwide throughout temperate and polar coastal oceans. In 2007, kelp forests were also discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador."

How can kelp forests near Ecuador have gone undiscovered until 2007?!?
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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New Scientist has a special edition in which they endeavor to correct science text books.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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What interested me about that list was that if you had taken any one of them and announced it to an academic specialist you would not have got a hearing. Not even close.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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Have we done this one? I don't think so.

Where am I?

  • The main river, running west-east through the land,
  • goes by a DN name and an IS name,
  • and empties into a sea whose name means "north".
  • To the south is a sea called by some the Hellespont
  • and the waterway passes through a place whose name means "ox passage".
Obvious, innt? The Danube, a.k.a. the Ister, crosses Europe to the Black Sea, where 'black' is said to denote the north. From there, the Bosporus leads to the Hellespont before reaching the Mediterranean.

Er...

Obvious innt? The Thames, a.k.a. the Isis, crosses England to the North Sea. Wilkens argues that, as an arm of the North Sea, the English Channel is part of the Hellespont. And, of course, the Thames passes through Oxford.

Hmm...

---

Bosporus, "ox passage" = Phosphorus, "light bearer". Does Oxford in England -- of which there is only one --happen to bear any connotation of "enlightenment"?

Well, "teaching at Oxford existed in some form in 1096, but it is unclear at what point a university came into being". Or "Oxford is a seat of learning of unknown antiquity".

---

Wilkens identifies Lesbos as the Isle of Wight, but finds no trace of the name remaining. But what if -bos means ox, as in Bosporus? And Les- means, well, less? What would a "lesser ox" mean? A cow, as in Cowes on the Isle of Wight, named for the sand banks framing the entrance to the harbour?
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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From The Megalithic Empire (which Mr Crisp, as a newcomer to this site, won't have read):

Two sources confidently state that St Neot founded Oxford University, something of an anachronism since Neot was a contemporary of King Alfred in the ninth century and Oxford was founded in the twelfth century, but Megalithically it makes complete sense because the universities were the direct successors of the monastic scriptoria. According to the Welsh authors of the Mabinogion King Lud measured Britain to find the centre which turned out to be Oxford, making it from a Megalithic point of view an ideal site for the country's premier seat-of-learning.

The Mabinogion is most likely a modern invention but Oxford's links with the Classical world seem to be anciently rooted. Oxford = Bosphorus i.e. Ox = Bos, cow; ford = phorus, passage of. It is located on a stretch of the Thames called the Isis. However it should not be automatically assumed that the British places are named for the Classical ones rather than the other way round
.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Another example of don/stags/rivers From Yorkshire.

River Don

River Rother

Roe Deer ham.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Don words are misunderstood.

Don=hill

Don=Hillfort

Don=water in connection with rivers

Don=Academic

You don clothes....

Guys its just a "dark/brown/black colour" as Dan says it come from the black sea.....

Place name theorists have rubbed most of the colour out of the British landscape....

But it is still there......

You just need to look.....
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