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Alphabet Soup (Linguistics)
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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DPCrisp wrote:
"The ancient Egyptians often thought of transitions from one state to another in terms of birth. Thus, kings were shown as children (or even as adults) protected and nursed by goddesses in a variety of scenes, including ones representing or symbolizing their alleged divine births, their coronations, renewals of their royal and divine power, and their rebirth after death."


Which makes it possible that these "Tut" names do in fact imply some child-like quality.
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Grant



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Ishmael wrote
Which makes it possible that these "Tut" names do in fact imply some child-like quality.


Or maybe they all had man boobs?
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Grant wrote:
Or maybe they all had man boobs?


Tit! Right. I forgot that one. Another apparent connection to children.
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Wes Kit


In: Yorkshire
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Ishmael wrote:
Grant wrote:
Or maybe they all had man boobs?


Tit! Right. I forgot that one. Another apparent connection to children.


Dood in Hindi= milk. Or the name could be derived from Dude, a person to be respected.
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Wireloop


In: Detroit
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.
What letter is this?


If you said the English or Latin letter E then I would say that you are correct, insofar as how it looks. But actually it is the Greek letter 'sigma' or ' S ' sound.

Now how about this letter?


If you said the letter Z or F, then I'd say that you are correct insofar as how it looks, but actually it is the Hebrew letter 'Yod' or the ' short y ' sound.

How about this letter?


Again, if you said the letter E, then I'd say that you are correct insofar as how it looks and sounds. It is actually the Hebrew letter 'He' or the ' Heh ' sound.

How about this letter?

If you said the letter Y, then you would be correct insofar as how it looks, but it is actually the hbrew letter 'vav' or the 'vee' sound.

So if the above letter that looks like a Z is actually a Z, and one of the above letters that looks like an E is actually an E, and the above letter that looks like a Y is actually a V, and the first above letter that looks like an E is actually an S. What does that spell?

Z E V S

Look familiar?

Not only does it spell ZEUS, but those are the same exact letters in the Tetragammon (the four letters of Hebrews God Jehovah).
Y E V E

The only caveat is that the first letter 'sigma' which looks like an E is rotated 180 degrees in 'hebrew'. I suspect that in the migration of peoples between 'phoenicia' and 'ionia' YEVE became ZEVS and 'rotations' of the sort are expected to happen, depending if you write right to left, left to right, top to bottom, in a circle, etc.... The Greek script was originally, like Phoenician, written right to left but evolved left to right.
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Wireloop


In: Detroit
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Could someone who knows about these things substitue a Yod for the Tripod logo. I never thought I'd utter that sentence.

Done!


The following should mingle with the Exodus thread.
You see, in the Greek legends the Muses are the mediators of inspiration/knowledge/writing. For example Homer's Odyssey (another Exodus type story) opens with the invocation of the Muse. One of the earliest instances of its usage.

...Tell me, O muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might he could not save his men, for they perished through their own sheer folly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the god prevented them from ever reaching home....


The letter 'sin/shin' in Phonecian and Paleo-Hebrew are the same and both look a bit like a W. In Greek this letter is rotated 90 degrees and is called 'sigma', being phonetically the same as sin/shin.

You probably know this already so I won't dwell on it, but why is this important?

You see the name 'Moses' in Hebrew is written Mem -- Sin -- He. Traditionally this can be pronounced either MooSHa, MooSa, MoeSa, MooSeh, MooSheh, MoeSHeh. The Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament ca 200 BC) spells Moses as Mouses (pronounced MooSes).

The transliterated Greek word for Muse in Homer is Mousa (pronounced MooSa). Muse = Moses.

So, beside the spelling and phonetics being the same, what else is in common between Muse and Moses?
They both are MEDIATORS of GOD 'inspired' Word.

Homer wrote in the 'Ionian script' which is said to be the most ancient and easternmost (Kadmos) of the Greek scripts.

The so called 'paleo-hebrew' and 'Phonecian' script are identical and it is said that the Phoenician prince Kadmos 'brought' the script to Greece. In fact I suspect that name Kadmos is from the Hebrew word qadam, which means both 'from the east' and 'ancient'. Get it? 'Kadmos' brought ancient writing/stories/thinking from the east (Phoenicia) to Greece. However by Plato's time it was formalized into a systematic philosophy and the stories are barely recognizable. The escape from Plato's Cave I propose IS the philosophical Exodus....retold. You can find more on this in my recent post on the Exodus in the philosophy section.

Going back to Homer for a bit. I propose that Homer's Odyssey is another philosophical Exodus.
1) Slave/Hostage = Odysseus 'soul'
2) Slavemaster = Odysseus' appetite / pride
3) Deliverance/Redemption = Odysseus' near death experience in Ocean. Death of self.
4) Renewal = Phonecians take him home to slay the suitors and restore the Kingdom.

Anyway, I'm not sure if anybody ever made this correlation (probably not), but do you know what Homer means in Greek?

HOSTAGE!

And what is the philosophical ransom of a hostage?
Death of self. The firstborn nature.

Accordingly we all are 'Homers', and it is the Muse who inspires the writer (Homer) to affect change in the reader (Homer). In other words the story is meant to convict the reader that their status in life is one of a Hostage, imprisoned in a cave, enslaved in Egypt, lover of appetite....a prodigal son.
It is a wake up call.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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The letter 'sin/shin' in Phonecian and Paleo-Hebrew are the same and both look a bit like a W

gwin/win in Welsh is white, fair. I guess it's the root of English 'queen' but there's also a connection probably with the white i.e. moon goddess?

Sin/shin is similar to shine perhaps the Muses are 'shining ones'.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Wireloop wrote:
[Accordingly we all are 'Homers', and it is the Muse who inspires the writer (Homer) to affect change in the reader (Homer). In other words the story is meant to convict the reader that their status in life is one of a Hostage, imprisoned in a cave, enslaved in Egypt, lover of appetite....a prodigal son.
It is a wake up call.


The Muse stuff is very informative.

But, before you go on....

Why dont you come over to our fire.

You are our guest, stranger.

Sit down, before us.

Tell us, your "to" and "from" story.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Wireloop is well known to most of the early participants here. He tends to die and rise from the dead with some regularity.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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So does the late Nate. Birds of a feather.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Wile E. Coyote wrote:


You are our guest, stranger.

Sit down, before us.

Tell us, your "to" and "from" story.


HOSTAGE>>>Online Etymology Dictionary.

late 13c., from O.Fr. hostage "person given as security or hostage" (12c., Mod.Fr. ˘tage), either from hoste "guest" (see host (1)) via notion of "a lodger held by a landlord as security," or from L.L. obsidanus "condition of being held as security," from obses "hostage," from ob- "before" + base of sedere "to sit" [OED]. Modern political/terrorism sense is from 1970.

ODYSSEUS>>>Wiki

The etymology of the name is contested, according to one view, the name Odysseus derives from the verb odussomai (ὀδύσσομαι), meaning "to be wroth against', 'hate", suggesting that the name could be rendered as "the one who is wrathful/hated".[2][3][4][5][6][7] Alternatively, it has been also suggested that this is of non-Greek origin and probably of non-Indo-European origin too, while it is of an unknown etymology.
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Wireloop


In: Detroit
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Wile E. Coyote wrote:

The Muse stuff is very informative.

But, before you go on....

Why dont you come over to our fire.

You are our guest, stranger.

Sit down, before us.

Tell us, your "to" and "from" story.


Clever Coyote,
Like all those with a renewed mind,
We're fated to choose last, in time.

http://www.davidson.edu/academic/classics/neumann/CLA350/ErMyth.html
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Jorn



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Mick Harper wrote:

I trust you spotted this in the last entry from the infamous 'tacked-on' bit of the Peterborough Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Me henged bi the ■umbes, other bi the hefed" It sounds like English but I can't entirely make sense of it. Offers?


The B seems for me to come in words where you "should" use double m to indicate a short vowel.

Reading that as a mix old Norse and modern English, it would be:

I hanged by the thumbs, others by the head.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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This makes me think it's quite likely Anglo-Saxon is a made-up language from a much more recent era, as some have alleged.
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Jorn



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Ishmael wrote:
This makes me think it's quite likely Anglo-Saxon is a made-up language from a much more recent era, as some have alleged.


You might be interested in this:

UiO linguist makes sensational claim: English is a Scandinavian language

Contrary to popular belief, the British did not 'borrow' words and concepts from the Norwegian and Danish Vikings and their descendants. What we call English is actually a form of Scandinavian.

http://www.apollon.uio.no/english/articles/2012/4-english-scandinavian.html


The presentation can be found here:

http://conference.uaa.utb.cz/TheoriesAndPractice2010.htm
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