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Inventing History : forgery: a great British tradition (British History)
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Mick Harper
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St Oswald's Church (Dean) Country: England Topic: Early Medieval (Dark Age)
Church in Cumbria containing a large cup and ring marked boulder, and medieval grave slabs, the latter being built into the fabric of the building. Just to the south of the nave is a preaching/churchyard cross. St Oswald's Church is largely C12 with C13 and C15 extensions and C17 alterations. http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=47100

When they say 'largely' they mean it is an entirely Norman church but built by Normans who like to incorporate Anglo-Saxon grave slabs into the walls. When they say "large cup and ring marked boulders" they normally ascribe them to pre-history.

But apart from that, it's a Dark Age church. "Add it to the list, Mabel."
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Mick Harper
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Lead Taken From Core Samples In Ostia

1. For those of you who suspect the existence of the Dark Ages notice that the reading for 250 AD is identical to the reading for 800 AD.
2. For those of you who suspect that science gets (mis)used by historians/archaeologists, notice that the 'scientific' age of the core sample has been 'adjusted' for the benefit of the 'historical' age assigned to it.
3. For those of you who suspect that 'creative labelling' is rife in academia, notice that the 'High & Late Middle Age' now starts at 800 AD.
4. For those of you who suspect archaeologists/historians always interpret data to whatever they already believe, this is interpreted as being correlated to the decline of the Roman Empire and... er... something or other happening in the Dark Ages.
5. For those of you who suspect I'm not at my strongest with tables and numbers and core samples, read the original here https://www.fluencecorp.com/brief-history-lead-water-supplies/


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Mick Harper
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“Busy as a bee” Meaning: very busy and active.

Origin: This simile that has become the standard for describing someone who is very busy, was introduced to the world by literary icon, Geoffrey Chaucer. In Canterbury Tales, first published in 1392, he wrote:

“ Ey! Goddes mercy!” sayd our Hoste tho,
Now such a wyf I pray God keep me fro.
Lo, suche sleightes and subtilitees
In wommen be; for ay as busy as bees
Be thay us seely men for to desceyve,
And from a soth ever a lie thay weyve.
And by this Marchaundes tale it proveth wel.”

I wonder if the OED records the second use of the simile.
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Ishmael


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Mick Harper wrote:
Lead Taken From Core Samples In Ostia

1. For those of you who suspect the existence of the Dark Ages notice that the reading for 250 AD is identical to the reading for 800 AD.


How might it be possible for ice to freeze simultaneously at different depths?
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