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Mega-Talk (Megalithic)
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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In The Megalithic Empire we make occasional reference to salvia (sage in English) without ever discovering what it is -- or was in ye ancient times. This little story from today's medium.com suggests it might have had its uses in mystery religions and such like. Powerful stuff. https://medium.com/s/trips-worth-telling/the-salvia-trip-that-took-me-from-alaska-to-texas-6478bd5c5d57
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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To be fair, in TME we mention that sage contains thujone, the compound present in artemisia (wormwood) and associated with mind-altering experiences.

The Medium.com article makes the point that botanists across the ages repeat, plant substances can be medicinal or toxic depending on quantities used.
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Mick Harper
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In a discussion about tourism and Stonehenge ["Why didn't they build a railway station near it?" etc] this interesting snippet appeared

A few years back I noticed a book called The Megalithic Empire in the library. It varies from usefully questioning archaeological orthodoxies to crackpot, incorporating a few basic mistakes of easily verified fact along the way (such as the relationship between the Biblical Anne and Mary), but its basic premise is that Stonehenge and similar stone circles were not "used for ritual purposes" but were trade centres, the focus of long distance trade routes and operating as a sort of market and distribution centre. Something like a market with accompanying bus station. But they never suggested a helicopter pad!

What is most interesting though is an application of the 'Bogus List' test. Every critic of the book complains of 'basic mistakes of easily verified fact' and every critic of the book uses 'the relationship between the Biblical Anne and Mary' as an instance of it. A great comfort.
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Mick Harper
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Megalithic Empire has finally been recognised as the epochal work it is by being cited in a Ph D thesis

Barren (Yeld ): (Traces of Ain)Landscape, Postcolonialism and Identity by Filippa Jane Dobson
https://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/20604/1/Dobson_FJ_Design_PhD_2017.pdf
When Species Meet: Posthumanities Volume 3. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press

Not the book itself maybe but certainly the walk featured on the website

Harper, M.J. & Vered, H.L. 2012.The Megalithic Empire: When you get home. Nathan Carmody. [Online].
[Accessed 6 November 2015]. Available from: http://www.themegalithicempire.com/.


It's Hatty I'm pleased for. I get cited every day of the week (matinées Wednesday & Saturdays) but she has to struggle for recognition. Despite those weird hats.
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Mick Harper
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A regular correspondent has sent me this. https://old.world-mysteries.com/newgw/gw_stristan1.htm

Some of you will know about Sylvain Tristran (I'm sure I watched a lecture of his once) but reading through the article I was struck by how much it resembles the basic tenets of Megalithic Empire (the book, and even more some of the threads in the forum). Though obviously we don't go in for the fancy stuff.
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Mick Harper
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A nice puff for The Megalithic Empire and things connected here https://www.ogbournestgeorge.org.uk/mega-og

I expect it's some old biddy with time on her hands in between Neighbourhood Watch meetings.
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Ishmael


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Mick Harper wrote:
In The Megalithic Empire we make occasional reference to salvia (sage in English) without ever discovering what it is -- or was in ye ancient times. This little story from today's medium.com suggests it might have had its uses in mystery religions and such like. Powerful stuff. https://medium.com/s/trips-worth-telling/the-salvia-trip-that-took-me-from-alaska-to-texas-6478bd5c5d57


That story is mind blowing.

I recently saw a video where a man relayed a similar claim of a parallel life he lived after ingesting some drug of a type I can't recall.

Did he ever make any attempt to locate any of the people he supposedly knew in Texas? That's the first thing I would have done upon reemerging from the "dream."

But the story is so astounding, can it even be believed?
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Hatty
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Ishmael wrote:
But the story is so astounding, can it even be believed?

It made me think of some of those children's stories where someone falls asleep and finds a hundred years have passed when they wake up. I'm beginning to wonder if fairy tales have more connections to drug experiences than is healthy. Alice in Wonderland is unusual as it does specifically refer to perspective-altering mushrooms but traditional stories probably weren't intended for children.
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Mick Harper
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Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining Department

Tottiford Reservoir Country: England Topic: Neolithic and Bronze Age
With the drought of 2022 now exposing the stone circle in Tottiford reservoir, I went down for an exploration yesterday.. Stone circle and rows in Devon. Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a prehistoric complex, buried beneath a reservoir in southern England. Archaeologists observing are justifiably astonished at its existence. http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=24205
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Mick Harper
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What's a Greek Urn Joke

Koutsounari fish tank Country: Greece Topic: Date Uncertain
A hole in the rock with access to the sea. Fish were kept in it. There are different statements about the age, some say the site is Roman, others place it in Minoan times. Located in Crete. http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=57363

Notice the experts vary by fifteen hundred years as to its age. But they are archaeologists so forbear to say, "Therefore it might just as well be medieval or modern." There is still the question of how these things work in a tideless sea which we have never quite got to grips with.
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Mick Harper
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Is there anything to this navigation by sight lines stuff?

Caer Caradoc (Chapel Lawn) Country: England Topic: Iron Age and Later Prehistory
This is the more southerly of two hillforts in Shropshire named Caer Caradoc. The earthworks are well preserved with several ditches at least one entrance. The fort is accessible via a footpath on either side, sheep roam over the hill and there is a fair bit of gorse growing on the top. On a clear day looking towards the east from the “gates” you can see the standing stone of Pen-y-cwm. http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=4932
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