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Dark Age Obscured (History)
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Mick Harper
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By the usual happy coincidence, I was digging out a piece Hatty and I did about the Greek Dark Age (put on hold for the present book) to send to a Fomenko-ist, when this turned up on medium.com

The Lesser-Known Dark Ages Which You Have Probably Never Heard Of Prateek Dasgupta
https://historyofyesterday.com/the-lesser-known-dark-ages-which-you-have-probably-never-heard-of-100e2713e493

It turned out to be just the one, the Greek Dark Age, but at least the bloke had very properly widened the scope

Cities across the Mediterranean, North Africa, and the Middle East fell apart during the late Bronze Age. Sophisticated civilizations were destroyed, and they never recovered. The world plunged into an era of darkness.

And topical too

An important lesson for us from the Bronze Age collapse is to realize a globalized world has fragile systems which can suffer from disruptions. What happens in one part of the world can change the lives of humans elsewhere.

So we'd best find out what happened...
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Mick Harper
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Why did they collapse? Historians in the late nineteenth century attributed the reason for the downfall to Sea Peoples, relying on ancient Egyptian sources.

I don't think you should be quite so dismissive, the entire chronology of ancient history relies on Egyptian sources. More's the pity.

The Sea Peoples were a group of invaders who appeared unannounced on the beaches of the Bronze Age cities and razed them. They looted, murdered, and left nothing but ashes behind. And suddenly they vanished!

I think Alexandria is still there. But one can see the problem of getting sea-people to polish off all the societies that didn't live on the coastline of the Eastern Med. Still, by your tone I can tell you're confident twentieth century academics have come up with the real reason.

When we analyze the causes of the Bronze Age collapse, famines are one of the strongest suspects.

A six hundred year famine! Call Greta Thunberg.

But what happened because of droughts? The irrigation and agriculture systems got affected.

Now there, I one hundred per cent agree with you. Drought - irrigation - agriculture, it's a straight line to hell. Great minds, eh? Got anything else, it's still a bit thin even by historians' standards..

Some scientists blame diseases for the bronze age’s demise, but they were the product of failed sanitary systems.

A bit harsh, some of my best friends are scientists. But fair. However, I seem to have lost faith in science when it comes to worldwide disease. Dunno why, just a feeling. If that's it on the causal side, can we move on to the more exciting effect side. Plenty of tearing of hair, please. Maybe a bared breast but I leave the details to you...
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Mick Harper
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    Those who lived in complex urban centers abandoned them. They moved to the foothills of mountains or in rural places remote from towns.

    Villages from a previous, less refined era replaced sophisticated urban planning. Humans began to live in mud houses rather than brick structures.

    As inhabitants watched their cities filling up with the dead and diseases spread, they fled. The new towns in the foothills lacked the sanitary levels found in urban areas, and it would be some time before it was restored.

    The intricate international trading system imploded. Though trade was carried out among the new upcoming settlements, the volume wasn’t the same. The accounting systems, which documented every tax receipt and trade agreement, vanished.

    Weights and measures which were common among the civilizations of the era stopped being used, barring Egypt and Assyria.

    Farmers were given instructions on when and how to harvest their crops since management during the Bronze Age was centralized and top-down. Because of the world collapsing, such commands stopped coming from the top, and the farms were gradually abandoned.

    Art and crafts also suffered during this period. Lacking royal patronage, the pottery post Bronze era was significantly poorer than the beauty seen before. Because humans had to undertake several activities for daily survival, devoted potters may have died out, and the craft suffered
    .
Steady on, old chap, we have women and children among our readers. But we here are more concerned with history. There's an awful lot to write about and I bet there was no shortage of Jeremiahs queuing up to tell us about it. "Gripe, grips, gripe; winge, winge winge" signed 'Disgusted of Tigris Wells'.

The disappearance of writing was the greatest tragedy of the Bronze Age collapse. Training scribes, who were professional writers and record keepers during the Bronze Age, was a costly procedure. They had to be schooled from a young age and devote their entire lives to their craft. With the economy in free fall, there was no money for the central authority to pay the scribes, so they gave up their profession. Writing systems perished, and it would take 400 years for writing and record-keeping to be restored at the start of the Classical Era.

Now that, if you don't mind my saying so, is a real nuisance. It's a miracle you were able to tell us so much about it yourself.

Signed 'Disgusted of the AEL'
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Mick Harper
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Remember what you must have in order to declare a Dark Age. Or what you mustn't have. Take pottery. Now that's something human beings have been doing since the Stone Age. And pottery lasts in the ground since the Stone Age, so there's no disguising whether human beings are doing it or not. So that definitely qualifies the Sea Peoples' Dark Age -- every single one of them forgot how for six hundred years.

By the by, they used to say this about our own Dark Age but it was so ridiculous that they have ceased saying it. I don't know the current status of 'British Pottery 400 -1000 AD' but I expect something has been cobbled together. If that isn't a mixed metaphor. Roman shoes survived but not so much Anglo-Saxon ones. They had to go barefoot, dummy.

Then there's the literacy bit. That's much more modern, c 3000 BC, but just as useful so everyone forgetting how it's done is just as puzzling. Though not perhaps as puzzling as doing it much the way they did it after they'd remembered again. We call that 'folk memory' in the trade.

I have to say though that the idea of living in the country being less healthy than living in towns is absolutely true. Have you been out there lately? There's shit all over the fields. Come on, Farmer Giles, get that reversed polythene bag, start picking it all up and then putting it in a wheelie bin. Not Dark Age Farmer Giles's obviously, they've lost the knowledge of the wheel. And now the state's collapsed, they can forget about Assyrian set aside payments.

Good point about the Decline of Art though. The Turner Prize tries for the same effect but it just doesn't do it for me.
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