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All Things Roman (History)
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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The simple and obvious explanation is not that the Ninth died slaughtered in Scotland or Palestine etc but that it was reorganised.
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Wile E. Coyote wrote:
Wiley's new book, "Rome's missing legions", features the full list of all of them and discovers that legions have constantly changed their identities, some merging with other legions. The constant name and number changes and amalgamations mean that fictional histories get created, and it is impossible to trace any accurate records of individual legions.

You get a whiff of the problem by looking at "legion 2"

I suppose it's a bit like League Division Two. The title remains the same, but the contents change over the years.

Curious coincidence of the day, many of the teams in League Division Two are "Roman Towns".

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/league-two/table
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Are we to hear more of this book, Wiley? Are we to be regaled by snippets in the Reading Room?
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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First of all I have to complete my reading of "The decisive battles of the western world" JFC Fuller.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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You've been saying that since Mafeking was relieved (303 BC).
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Well it is two volumes, and I made the mistake of lending one out. I am hoping that Mafeking is in volume 2. I am sure it was significant, that is if we won. If we lost I will try to disprove it happened, bit like I have done with the defeat of Boudica.

"'But now,' she said, 'it is not as a woman descended from noble ancestry, but as one of the people that I am avenging lost freedom, my scourged body, the outraged chastity of my daughters. Roman lust has gone so far that not our very persons, nor even age or virginity, are left unpolluted. But heaven is on the side of a righteous vengeance; a legion which dared to fight has perished; the rest are hiding themselves in their camp, or are thinking anxiously of flight. They will not sustain even the din and the shout of so many thousands, much less our charge and our blows. If you weigh well the strength of the armies, and the causes of the war, you will see that in this battle you must conquer or die. This is a woman's resolve; as for men, they may live and be slaves.'"[15]
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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The 'Water Newton Treasure', discovered in Cambridgeshire near the Roman town of Durobrivae is declared to be

the earliest group of Christian liturgical silver yet found in the Roman Empire.

Wiki article says

The hoard was discovered during ploughing in February 1975; several items were damaged by the plough. It was probably buried by an inhabitant of the nearby Roman fortified garrison town of Durobrivae. There are nine silver vessels, and the remainder of the items are votive tokens engraved and embossed with the labarum (the chi-rho cross), mostly of triangular shape. The larger items include jugs, bowls, dishes, a strainer, and an unengraved standing two-handled cup of the form (cantharus) later used as chalices.

I tried to access the British Museum entry for more detail but it says 'Sorry, that page doesn't exist'

The hoard consisted of 27 silver items and one small gold plaque. Because of inscriptions found on some of the pieces in the collection it has been suggested that they may have been used in a local church, and they therefore comprise the earliest probable group of Christian liturgical silver yet found in the Roman Empire

The Christian connection hinges on an inscription on a silver bowl as per the British Museum listing which Wiki helpfully cites.

Inscribed silver bowl, height 11.5 cm, width 17 cm, weight 663 g. (1975,1002.5). Badly damaged at the base on one side, the bowl has inscriptions: under the base, the name "PUBLIANUS", and round the rim a regular hexameter line:"SANCTUM ALTARE TUUM DOMINE SUBNIXUS HONORO" engraved alongside two chi-rho monograms. The exact context of the inscriptions have been debated but "O Lord, I Publianus, relying on you, honour your holy altar [or church]." is probably the sense. The bowl is therefore marked as a votive offering, and associates the treasure with a church, or perhaps the private chapel of a large house

Thing is, inscriptions on a silver bowl can't be dated and there are no remains of a nearby church or chapel, otherwise we'd have been told all about them.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Well one of the oldest tricks in the book is to put an inscription on something. A Roman altar stone is worth close to nothing but add on a dedication "I legionnaire Wilius dedicate devout fortunes to goddess Hattia" (Obscure goddesses are worth more) and away you go. In actual fact it would be worth even more if the inscription was written in a way that was unusual, and so had to be decoded a bit, ie I should chuck in a couple of runes, whilst carving.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Obscure? Humph.
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