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Mega-Talk (Megalithic)
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Mick Harper
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I find this unlikely. It would take too much human intervention!
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Human intervention?

Like that necessary to create Google Maps? Or are those also the product of the latest satellite technology?
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Mick Harper
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Ishmael, please concentrate. Anywhere you move on a Google Earth survey, you will be told how high above sea level that point is. (I am assuming that, I've never used it myself.) How can human beings laboriously record every point on the earth's surface?

Now could you please stop this insane argument and get on with testing whether my theory has any merit. Please. It could be important.
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Ishmael


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Will do. I actually am persuaded that your notions might have merit.
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Hatty
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Meanwhile, more hills have been discussed vis-a-vis the Michael Line. They're called the Bartlow Hills, between Ashdon and Linton in north Cambridgeshire at the border with Suffolk and close enough to the Michael Line to make them of interest.

Bartlow Hills, originally seven large mounds that marked the southeast edge of Cambridgeshire, look almost as impressive as Silbury Hill. The biggest one is 44 ft high and 144 ft wide and is officially the tallest burial mound in Britain. Although only three fully now remain, Hamish Miller and Paul Broadhurst found that the ‘Michael energy current’ ran very close them and went directly through the ‘Three Hills Pub’. ....... The mounds are an incredible sight that do not fit in with the Cambridgeshire landscape and they run very close to a main path of the ancient Icknield Way, that stretches all the way from Thetford to the area of Avebury and Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, where it connects with the Ridgeway.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/hugh-newman/bartlow-hills-seven-conical-mounds-in-cambridgeshire/10153407347720948

This author of this article is Hugh Newman who lives in Cambridgeshire but spends a lot of time researching and networking abroad. He quite rightly points out that 'Roman tumuli' is completely daft due to the prehistoric flint tools excavated here.

However, he claims these were most likely signal stations and talks about 'dragon energies'. A much more likely candidate for a 'signal site' is Ashdon's All Saints Church, the usual church-on-a-hill, which, using the new-found Google Earth method, is more than 30 metres (c. 100 feet) higher than the so-called burial mounds.

Ashdon is situated on an ancient road running from Saffron Walden to Bartlow. The village now consists of two distinct parts, the older part by far being the hamlet around the church at the top of the hill. The original settlement there may go back to pre- Christian times and it is possible that a pagan temple once stood on the site of the church. The original medieval village was situated to the east of the church, this being indicated by the 'platforms' and ditches in the field immediately to the east of the present chancel.
'All Saints Church' Archaeologists have described it as being the most impressive village site in Essex. What is left of the old village is represented by a few cottages and the Guildhall grouped around a small green south of the churchyard. The much larger settlement down in the valley was not established until the 13th or 14th century, and the move down the hill may have been prompted by an attempt to escape the Black Death.

Ashdon is mentioned in the Domesday Book but the village around the church will have been in existence for centuries before 1086. The place in the Book is Ascenduna. The name became Ashdon in about 1375. The meaning is Ash Tree Hill being derived from two Saxon words, 'Aescun' (of the ash tree) and 'Dun' ( a hill). This was a very wooded area and the ash was a very common tree in Anglo-Saxon England.


The church is just to the south-west of the mounds. The Bartlow Hills themselves are in a parallel double row and despite erosion were clearly conical-shaped. They've been compared to similar hills in Wiltshire like Silbury and Merlin's Mound. The orangey colouring in the photo reminded me of a row of traffic cones left by road engineers.

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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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The Bartlow Hills are already on the TME map

https://tme.cartodb.com/viz/9e11e430-2f85-11e4-b9f4-0e230854a1cb/map
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Megalithic Empire has quite a bit on corvids but the Trickster is looking for a new tactic.

It always bothered me when reading ME that Corvus was clearly circular ( Corvid= Curved) but ME was viewing the bird as straight.

Then it hit me, this about circular time before the sacred chronologists imposed straight line time on us.

The answer then becomes clearer. Straight line time has evolved from circular time.

The Corvid has evolved from the Phoenix.

So Christianity in fact evolved from the beliefs of the so-called Phoenicians who had their beliefs transported around the Mediterranean wherever they traded and established colonies. Their greatest Colony was Carthage, the stones were coming from Carnac.

The Christians in fact have covered their tracks by giving the Vikings Raven banners and a propensity to burn down churches.

But unfortunately it is there in black (ravens) and white (eagles)

Obvious really.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Ancient History is useless as a means of understanding the world.
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Mick Harper
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This is ancient history as far as you are concerned, Ishmael. I don't know why you have to keep saying it. Is it some sort of magic incantation that you have to utter every time Capricorn enters Aquarius?
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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I'm the Cato the Elder of Applied Epistemology. You can't say you weren't warned.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Is he the one that had the red hot poker shoved up his jaxie?
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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I didn't get the Corvid joke.

I've failed another Intelligence Test.

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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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It turns out that Carne Beacon in Cornwall is claimed to be "the largest Bronze Age burial mound in England" though the locals don't apparently know where it is

Bronze Age barrow on the outskirts of Veryan Churchtown. The mound (tumulus) is one of the largest in the UK with a circumference of 370 feet (113 metres) and 28 feet (6 metres) at its highest point. It stands at one of the highest points on The Roseland with stunning views over Gerrans Bay.

The OS map shows the beacon-barrow is sited above Carne beach which is sheltered and sandy at low tide, a handy landing place for tin traders. Just north-west of the barrow is 'Veryan Castle', a so-called Iron Age fort although it's clearly useless as a defensive site being overlooked on three sides, so perhaps more appropriately categorised as an entrepot/collection point.

The church of the 'Churchtown' is dedicated to St Symphorian and Veryan is said to be 'a corruption of Severian', hence St Veryan, but the earliest written record, in Domesday, is 'Elerchi'. As elerch means 'swan' in Cornish and in Welsh, it may be there was a swannery here (cf. Abbotsbury in Dorset on the Fleet lagoon).

During the Second World War the barrow was used as the first above ground lookout post in Cornwall.
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Mick Harper
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Did anyone mention how old the word 'beacon' in Carne Beacon is? It is pretty odd anyone using the term unless it was a beacon. Even the second world war soldiers thought of it as them looking out rather than the Germans coming in and looking for a sign. Also the squaddies had a telephone to tell the next hill along if the Germans actually showed up so they wouldn't have used the term in the sense of lighting it up to warn everyone..

I have a vague feeling that Carne is important too though I can't recall why. Nice spot about the swans. I knew sending you off for Cornish lessons would pay off in the end.
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Hatty
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There is a cairn on top, the highest point of the barrow, which calls to mind hills with a medieval church or chapel on their summit. It presumably served as a seamark, with or without a beacon. There is an accompanying legend of a Cornish king, Gerennius, supposedly buried in the mound with a golden boat, which seems to have been invented in the 1850s.
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