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Inventing History : forgery: a great British tradition (British History)
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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But when 'England' became a political unit, and therefore requiring a name, isn't very clear. Certainly before King John lost (most of) France, it wasn't.

It may be that England is the Anglicised form of Angleterre, in other words it didn't exist as a separate political entity before the fourteenth century territorial wars with France. As far as I can tell there are no written references to 'Angle-land'.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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The Ortho myth is that the many tribes of Angles, Saxons, Jutes etc that migrated to Britain had a common ancestor, Woden, legendary king of Angeln.

Caser (sic), one of the sons of Woden, migrated to Britain in the late fifth and early sixth centuries and founded the Anglian kingdom of the East Angles.

The twelfth century Textus Roffensis lists the kings of the East Angles right back to Woden, as does the Historia Brittonum by Nennius. Mick has had a go at the weird Textus Roffensis.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I did, in Forgeries, though at the time I had no reason to suppose it was other than a twelfth century forgery. My position has become more radical since then.
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Hatty
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Wiki has an article on Cistercian numerals which I haven't come across before. Not sure if this is the right place as the system isn't a forgery though it is invented.

It sounds like a sort of shorthand for numbers rather than characters. The Wiki article says the Cistercians developed their numerals

in the early thirteenth century at about the time that Arabic numerals were introduced to northwestern Europe. They are more compact than Arabic or Roman numerals, with a single character able to indicate any integer from 1 to 9999.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cistercian_numerals

There is something odd though because the invention of the numeral system is attributed to John Basing/Basingstoke, Archdeacon of Leicester (died 1252)

The numeral system was invented in the 1300s by French Cistercian monks, based on symbols introduced by John of Basingstoke.

Basingstoke is better known for collaborating with Robert Grosseteste on a dodgy manuscript than for inventing numerals

Basingstoke was an advocate of Greek literacy and seems to have been instrumental in introducing the apocryphal Testament of the Twelve Patriarchs to Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln. What is known of Basingstoke derives primarily from the writings of Grosseteste and another contemporary, Matthew Paris.

Is it normal for a rather important figure in the church hierarchy to be relatively unknown? The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs appears to be a forgery produced by Robert Grosseteste who 'rediscovered' the hitherto lost text and translated it into Latin in 1242. John Basingstoke was the person who first identified the manuscript according to Matthew Paris.

The chronicler, Matthew Paris, tells how in the late 1230s, one of Grosseteste’s assistants, John of Basingstoke, recalled seeing a Greek manuscript containing a text called the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs in the library of the metropolitan Michael Choniates when he was in Athens some 40 years earlier. The bishop sent envoys to Athens and MS Ff.1.24, almost certainly Choniates’ copy, was brought to England for him. There are notes in Grosseteste’s hand throughout, demonstrating that he read the whole codex.

Of the apparently original Greek manuscript no more is heard except the place of origin is 'Constantinople'. The ownership record is surprisingly familiar

Former Owner(s): Choniates, Michael, 1138-approximately 1222; Grosseteste, Robert, 1175?-1253; Parker, Matthew, 1504-1575
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