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The Basques: History's First Industrial Fishery Mega-Corp (Pre-History)
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Hi, Dunc, good to see Medicine Hat has been reconnected with the internet. The Basques seem to have gone by other names when it comes to beach work

There are 17 tidal islands which can be reached from the Scottish mainland, and at least a further 20 around the Outer Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland. They have been colonised by Vikings, used as military bases in wartime and even become places of religious pilgrimage .https://www.scotsman.com/arts-and-culture/scottish-tidal-islands-you-can-walk-without-ferry-1444460

Round round get around, I get around
Get around round round I get around
From town to town I get around
I'm a real cool head, I'm makin' real good bread
Round, round, I get around.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Duncan71 wrote:
I've never seen much of the east coast myself, being a prairie boy, but it would seems to me that many of these causeway-like structures can be found in other parts of the maritime provinces.


Yes. In fact, you can find them in South American and even Australia. But you will also notice that they are not everywhere. For example, they aren't even on the northern or eastern coasts of Newfoundland.
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Mick Harper
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The Living Beach Series 1, Episode 2 Nova Scotia (Sky Nature)

This featured the Bay of Fundy which enjoys the world record largest tidal range thus linking it with the world's second largest tidal ranges that dot the Megalithically rich places at the western end of the English Channel. A possible reason for the connection, apart from anything conjectured above by our two natives, is the way it massively attracts migrating birds. There is a small possibility that the Bay of Fundy has been humanly engineered.

The Hundred Wild Islands have the look of Hebridean islands but the Nova Scotian weather in the summer must be vastly different if the sight of surfers without wetsuits at Lewistown (get the name!) is anything to go by. If you can access the telly prog, you will be entertained with some marvellously soppy stuff about how one minute it's attached to Africa via Continental Drift and the next minute it's disappearing in one man's lifetime.

All highly beguiling as well as informative, largely because everything is terribly pristine and everyone seems terribly British.
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Mick Harper
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The Living Beach Series One, Episode Six California (Sky Nature)

When a brown pelican flies lower on the water, it's conserving its energy even more by creating a cushion of compressed air between its wings and the water's surface. This allows it to skim great distances without tiring.

Why aren't we doing this?
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Mick Harper wrote:
Why aren't we doing this?


What do you mean "we", paleface?

See the Soviet-era ground-effect aircraft, or Caspian Sea Monsters.



In 1966 the Central Hydrofoil Design Bureau under Rostislav Alekseev produced a gargantuan "ekranoplan" ("surface plane") combining the smooth hull form of a ship with stub wings, a large vertical fin and horizontal tail. The craft featured ten engines: eight mounted in two clusters of four directly behind the cockpit to provide augmented lift, and two on the vertical fin to provide cruise power. This machine, which American intelligence organizations dubbed the Caspian Sea Monster, could lift 540 tons and cruise at over 300 mph at an altitude of over 10 feet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x22nVFTd8nI
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Mick Harper
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This is not the same thing at all. And nor is the hovercraft. We are looking, at this stage, for something like the way (para)gliders exploit thermals.
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Mick Harper wrote:
We are looking, at this stage, for something like the way (para)gliders exploit thermals.

I thought vultures did that, not pelicans. (I’m in the Boreades camp on this one.)

https://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Skimming.html
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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I concur. At the height a brown pelican is flying, it's certainly not in a thermal (a large mass of rising warmer air).

Let's try again:

Ground effect is the reduced aerodynamic drag that an aircraft's wings generate when they are close to a fixed surface. Reduced drag when in ground effect during takeoff can cause the aircraft to "float" whilst below the recommended climb speed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_effect_(aerodynamics)
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Mick Harper
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Isn't Borry's example more 'hydrofoil' i.e. a device for avoiding a bow-wave? But I see from your URL that this is also called 'ground effect' which is also what they called the hovercraft so maybe it, they, actually are exploiting Pelican-force. It applies to pelicans presumably because they need to be looking under the surface, not something vultures have much use for.

But really I wanted to know what's stopping those intrepid seaside sports folk inventing something. Maybe water-skiers a foot off the surface or something. But we must return to palaeoBasques. Sorry I spoke really. Just caught my eye.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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I'm coming back to this thread eventually.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I'd rather have have Dunc back, he was our most westerly member. Then truly the sun would never set on the Applied Epistemological empire. Except for a couple of hours.
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Duncan71


In: Calgary
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Ah, sorry Nick. I've been scouting the Aleutians for other candidates. Then the circle will be complete.
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