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All Things Roman (History)
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Mick Harper wrote:
Wiley, what's a copy of a coin? Aren't all coins, as it were, copies? These appear to be genuine (in the sense of being old) so do they mean they are rough rustic attempts at the real thing?


Cant make the link in the post work, but I guess they mean imitations.

http://augustuscoins.com/ed/imit/imitRICIX.html
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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For those not going down to Silbury Fields, the next best thing "in theme" that I can offer is appearing near you, for one night only.

Full 'Strawberry' Moon coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse TONIGHT - but rain clouds in parts of the UK may ruin the celestial spectacle.

A penumbral eclipse is the most subtle form, it occurs when the earth, sun and moon are all aligned - with the Earth casting a slight shadow over the Moon.

The eclipse will start at about 18:45 BST but won't be visible from the UK until the Moon rises above the horizon at 20:12 BST - it will end at about 21:00 BST.


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8391557/Full-Strawberry-Moon-coincides-penumbral-lunar-eclipse-tonight.html

Lunar In The Sky Without Diamonds.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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We have the te-le-vi-sion here in the city. But I suppose it must be nice all of you out there saying, "Nice yellow." "Is that a pink tinge?" "Aye, pet, a penumbral eclipse is the most subtle form." "It were subtler last year." "Aye, 'twas a good year last year."
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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The coin from the court of King Caratacus was just passing by...

Britain's first freedom fighter: Iron Age coin depicting warlord Caratacus who held back the invading Roman hordes nearly 2,000 years ago is set to fetch £30,000 at auction.

It is special?

Described as the 'most important single Iron Age coin ever found in this country', the coin depicts the leader Caratacus, who resisted the Roman invasion in 43AD.

Ooh, where's it from?

A metal detectorist dug the prize up in a field near Newbury, Berkshire, in November 2019, only 20 miles from where it was minted in modern day Silchester - then Calleva - 2,000 years ago. It was minted in Hampshire shortly before Emperor Claudius sent four legions to raid Britannia and may fetch as much as £30,000.

Although they don't say how it got there.

It might have been dropped by one of the fascinating witches who put the scintilating stiches in the britches of the boys who put the powder on the noses on the faces of the ladies of the harem of the court of King Caractacus.

If you want any more, you're too late .. they've stopped making them.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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only 20 miles from where it was minted in modern day Silchester - then Calleva - 2,000 years ago.

Reading University, which exhaustively excavated Silchester/Calleva for decades, never mentioned a mint. I'm not sure how a mint would be distinguished from other structual remains but the archaeologists, who reasonably enough claimed the site was of strategic importance, would have surely at least mooted the possibility of a mint there on even quite slender grounds.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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In the coin thread we reject this tosh. Basically they are claiming CAR(A)=Caratacus famous resister of Romans.

The mysterious Verica disapears to the continent, (err) prompting the Claudian invasion, he is replaced by the even more mysterious encroacher Epatticus. Epaticcus then disapears at the time of invasion and his silver coins, "inspired" (of course) partly by those of Vericas, ....now get replaced by "identical" types, carrying the inscription "CARA".

Then a gold one comes along. It's worth a lot of dosh, because of the romantic notion of Caratacus.

So who is the bloke on the horse? Heracles.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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Wile E. Coyote wrote:
Basically they are claiming CAR(A)=Caratacus famous resister of Romans.

'They' = Tacitus and Dio Cassius

Caratacus's name appears as both Caratacus and Caractacus in manuscripts of Tacitus, and as Καράτακος and Καρτάκης in manuscripts of Dio.

We already know that the two surviving manuscripts of Tacitus' works (Annals and Histories), said to comprise about half his output of purportedly thirty books, only appeared in 1515, produced by Filippo Beraldo the Younger at the behest of Pope Leo X. Will Dio Cassius turn out to be a more contemporary, i.e. reliable, source?

Cassius Dio (or Dion Cassius as he is known in Greek) wrote his Roman History in 80 books in Greek, sometime in the early 3rd century under Severus or Caracalla, both of whom he knew. Dio exerted no appreciable influence on his immediate successors in the field of Roman history. But among the Byzantines he became the standard authority on the subject, a circumstance to which we doubtless owe the preservation of such a large portion of his work. Most of the remainder is extant in the 'condensed book' format, or 'epitome' so favoured by the Byzantine.

It's odd, if Dio Cassius is so influential, that his writing had no influence on his own or later generations at least until a 12th century chronicler called John or Johannes Zonaras who lived and worked at Mount Athos [q.v.] chanced upon Dio's History, or at least the 'one third that has come down to us intact"

The version of Dio's work that survives today is quite composite since his history does not survive in its entirety: The first 21 books have been partially reconstructed based on fragments from other works as well as the epitome of Zonaras who used Dio's Roman History as a main source. Scholarship on this part of Dio's work is scarce but the importance of the Early Republic and Regal period to Dio's overall work has recently been underlined

Zonaras is supposed to have left numerous manuscripts but so far none have been located. As for the missing Dio manuscripts, various fragmentary references appear to have been cobbled together, copied and first published in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries

For our knowledge of the lost portions of Dio's work we have two kinds of sources:

(1) Excerpts contained in various Byzantine collections, together with brief quotations made by lexicographers and grammarians; and
(2) Epitomes by Zonaras and Xiphilinus, supplemented by occasional citations in other historical writers.

So much for documentary 'evidence' of Caratacus. What about archaeology, such as the Caratacus Stone? Strangely, the only part of the inscription that has weathered weathering is the name

The inscription, in Latin, appears to read CARAACI NEPVS, though experts have stated that a bar above the second A forms a ligature meaning that it should be read as CARATACI NEPVS. It is possible that there was more text on the stone that has weathered away.

The first mention of the stone was in 1219, when it was described in a perambulation of the Royal Forest of Exmoor as "the Langeston". In 1890 the letter N (which is reversed) was missing from the inscription, but by 1919 the missing piece had been found and was cemented back in place.

The inscription is 'believed to be 6th century', postdating the first-century Caratacus character by roughly five hundred years, so can hardly qualify as a contemporary record.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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A good, if long, piece on Roman-Etruscan links can be found here https://medium.com/@fcameronlister/why-the-romans-dont-want-you-to-know-about-the-etruscans-2a0ddb26233 Good because written by a sceptical amateur-enthusiast. The Serbian link was new to me, though the Zagreb letter need not be taken seriously, we've had a look at that previously. I would guess that most of the evidence is fake, Etruscan having the same allure for Italians as Anglo-Saxon does for us. Some intriguing 'Megalithic' links as well.
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