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Questions Of The Day (Politics)
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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I’m your first YouTube subscriber... Do I get some sort of badge?
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Minneapolis, Middlesbrough or Marseille?

All police forces are obliged to profile tactically just to be able to do their jobs and it's a fact of their lives that certain groups are a) identifiable and b) prone to crime disproportionately. These may be as unobjectionable as "male, youthful, city centre, late at night" but when it is racial (in Minneapolis and Marseille but not, I think, Middlesborough) then the police have to take into account that the identified group may also self-identify and react accordingly.

I apply no moral values here. Killing a few individuals to send out a message may be acceptable in a given society or it may not be. Right now, in America, it may be moving from one to the other. If the movement is too slow, riot is an equally legitimate response.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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What is De Gaulling is your whites have to put our yellow vests before they can riot. Not fair!
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Mick Harper wrote:

All police forces are obliged to profile tactically just to be able to do their jobs and it's a fact of their lives that certain groups are a) identifiable and b) prone to crime disproportionately. These may be as unobjectionable as "male, youthful, city centre, late at night" but when it is racial (in Minneapolis and Marseille but not, I think, Middlesborough) then the police have to take into account that the identified group may also self-identify and react accordingly.

I apply no moral values here. Killing a few individuals to send out a message may be acceptable in a given society or it may not be. Right now, in America, it may be moving from one to the other. If the movement is too slow, riot is an equally legitimate response.


This latest incident is atypical, in the sense that fatal police shootings of civilians normally occur during incidents of violent crime. Nobody really questions most of these as irrespective of the colour of the officers, or the fatality, it is felt that, if you perpetrate violent crime, you had it coming to you. In the Floyd incident, the white officer was using a known dangerous restraint technique on someone he did not know had a underlying heart condition. It will probably end up as manslaughter, rather than murder, and more rioting......
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Aside from the fact that the geezer had been stopped because he had been passing bad cheques and was already in handcuffs, standing on someone's neck for ten minutes, including three after he had lost consciousness, is not so much a dangerous restraining procedure as completely weird. It is true that the police universally carry out actions that expresses their general superiority over crims, over and above the merely functional and with our approval, but this surely goes beyond this. It is more appropriate to dealing with a wild animal.

The insouciancy and blatancy of the act -- in front of several other policemen and loads of bystanders -- indicates he thought he was doing something that was societally acceptable, and to which 'society' (the riots are now US-wide) is entitled to register dissent. To that extent he is actually innocent, apart from infractions of administrative procedures. In Britain this could easily earn a verdict of misadventure and a loss of pension rights. But then we are learning gradually that in modern societies police are more social workers than crime-busters though it is doubtful if the USA yet qualifies as a modern society. Ditto your French example where they seem to think they still live in a time when 'aux barricades' is an initial bargaining position.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I’m your first YouTube subscriber... Do I get some sort of badge?

Chad, would you mind unsubscribing yourself? Having one subscriber is worse than no subscribers since nobody is going to ask, "I wonder how many subscribers he has." You still get your cheque. The weird thing though is that no matter how many people look at it, it always says '10 views'. Anybody know why this is?
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Mick Harper wrote:
Aside from the fact that the geezer had been stopped because he had been passing bad cheques and was already in handcuffs, standing on someone's neck for ten minutes, including three after he had lost consciousness, is not so much a dangerous restraining procedure as completely weird.

There may be less here than meets the eye.

A bizarre twist in the murder of George Floyd was reported on Thursday night, as a former club owner in south Minneapolis revealed that Floyd worked at her club as a security guard, alongside recently fired police officer Derek Chauvin, the man who killed him. Club owner Maya Santamaria says that the two both worked the same security shift at El Nuevo Rodeo club on Lake Street, before the business was sold a few months ago.

Domestic dispute?
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Good spot. Just to add another little curlicue, it used to be illegal for cops to work second jobs. In the LAPD anyway -- there was a whole film based round the possibilities for corruption if they do. "Hey, Del, I'm gonna tell your precinct captain all about it." "Oh no you're not, Georgie Boy. I'll be seeing to that."
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Mick Harper wrote:
Me and Hatty did our bit by pointing out the true cause and we made a DVD about it. Due to vested interests or something, this did not receive the attention it deserved, so we've decided to put it on YouTube to give the world one last chance to redeem itself. You will find it here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uNQIMcKNTM&feature=youtu.be


Watching the video.

You're going to be amazed at the work I've done. I've answered so many questions and corrected so many of the misconceptions we had originally. Every problem you raise, and many more you don't, has now been solved.

I need to post more of the book here for you to review.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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Well now, Ishmael, not on past form. It's not just my baby being stolen by a man twirling a black moustache that's the problem but your writing style. You'd better be on your best behaviour.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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My writing has improved. Not as good as yours but I've been working on this book for six years. I'm far better than I was. I've given it to strangers to read and the overwhelming response is to beg for the next chapter after finishing the one before. I am doing my best but, if you would like to add some polish at the end, we can do that.

Meanwhile, after intensely focusing on this material for all these years, we can now explain...
  • Why water vapor moves from west to east.
  • How the Western Effect works: It's not how you explain it in the video (but close)
  • How water from the oceans gets back into the air again.
  • How the Eastern Effect operates: Its not the solution I proposed years ago---it's much simpler, and the solution explains the geographical boundaries in Saudi Arabia as you suspected it would.
  • We can even explain the Ogaden desert.
  • Other questions also are answered, such as why the ocean is so often cold to the west of deserts
  • Your suspicions about seasonal and latitudinal air temperature not being the result of the sun's angle are also confirmed (this is discussed briefly in the final chapter)
Everything works systematically and in accordance with AE principles. It's absolutely beautiful. The book affords a foundation for a grand unified theory of climate.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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If anyone would like to read this book, it's complete now up to Chapter Seven: The Western Effect. Nearing completion is Chapter Eight: the North-South Effect. Still in rough draft is Chapter Nine: The Eastern Effect.

On the other hand, Chapter 10 (untitled, but deals with the sand cycle), is fully complete, but for some polishing.

Two more chapters are to follow.

Chapter 11: Why There Are No Desert Islands, is a key chapter that serves in many ways as a twist ending. Very excited by this chapter as it answers so many of the questions I've listed above. Sadly, I've not written one word of this yet.

Lastly, Chapter 12 expands the desert distribution question to encompass Climatology as a whole, demonstrating that the systems used to account for deserts can serve as the foundation for a new, corrected, Climate Science. Again; I've written not one word of this yet. I just have a plan in my head.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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This is the cover I'm using for showing the book to beta-readers:



I should add the full title though:

THE WEATHER UNDERGROUND: A Subversive Essay on the Foundational Principles of Climate Science
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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It sounds both exciting and daunting. I can't handle such big chunks. Are you sure you wouldn't like to post small chunks down in the dungeons? Smaller than your last chunks. Don't get over-excited. Nothing's going to happen in our lifetimes. By the way, I go into Poet's Corner at St Paul's, you go into ... well, your local Wren church in Newfoundland. Deal?
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Chad, would you mind unsubscribing yourself? Having one subscriber is worse than no subscribers

I’m afraid the bandwagon has already started to roll. You now have three subscribers, so if I unsubscribe, leaving you with just two, that would (presumably) be worse than having three, but also (presumably) worse than having none. The big question then is; is three worse or better than none?

If three is deemed to be worse than none, you then have the task of tracking and tracing the other two subscribers and asking them to unsubscribe. The whole bloody thing could go viral.
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