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Continents Adrift (Geophysics)
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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This just kind of struck me as nonsense tonight.

What we call 'the reverse-mandala effect' (he says, having just made it up). The map of the world is, I suppose, the most familiar geographical artefact in our brains. And we know it's true. So when geographers start shifting continents about (and ending with the demonstrably true current layout) our brain registers this as sort of just-as-true. It doesn't matter how often you are told it is just some people doodling on the back of an envelope, your brain keeps on registering it as something that actually took place in history.

Then, all of a sudden, as happened with you, the reverse occurs and the scales fall. It's our task to find out how to engineer this effect at will with whosoever.
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DPCrisp


In: Bedfordshire
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Then, all of a sudden, as happened with you, the reverse occurs and the scales fall.

What we call the "Mick's Mandala effect". You constantly drum the fatuousness of Plate Tectonics into your head, heralding someone else's hesitation as enlightenment and encouraging them to misapprehend as much as you do.

I am still not arguing for Plate Tectonics, you understand.

But forces that push outward (or inward) are commonplace. Continental drift is likened to the effect of convection: imagine things welling up and circulating within a saucepan, depending on where the hottest point is; see how up-welling becomes horizontal movement at the surface; imagine a geologist saying "well, if things are moving like this, there must be currents circulating like so..."
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I was referring only to the shifting continents sequence. It is undeniable that all laypeople and most Earth Scientists are vaguely under the impression that Gondwanaland and Pangea actually existed.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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An article of importance I am parking here for future reference:

Biblical-Type Floods Are Real, and They're Absolutely Enormous
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Ishmael wrote:
An article of importance I am parking here for future reference:

Biblical-Type Floods Are Real, and They're Absolutely Enormous


But, yes, and then what? Since the end of the last Ice Age, haven't there been several eras when melt-water broke through and did Big Stuff to sea levels all over. See The English Channel.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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I found the information in this video shocking.

Earth has been misrepresented to us by Geologists. Because the [physical] globes that you buy, and you rub your fingers over and you feel the Himalayas and you feel the Rocky Mountains---no. No. These mountains are puny compared to the size of the Earth. [By touching the Earth's surface], you would not know [these features] were there.

If you were truly that size---some big cosmic giant, lumbering through space, coming upon the Earth, rubbing your hand on it---the depth of your fingerprints would be greater than the entire range of [depth] from the Marianas Trench, in the bottom of the Pacific, to the top of Mount Everest. Therefore, if you close your eyes you would not know whether you were [passing your fingers over] an ocean, valley, mountain or hill. You would not even notice [the wet]! You're not going to say; "Oh! I gotta dry my hand." The depth of the ocean doesn't measure up to the depth of your fingerprint.... Cosmically-speaking, we are practically a perfect sphere.
-- Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, Astrophysicist
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Courtesy of my academic colleagues, wot publish stuff, an interesting article:

"Poseidon’s Horses: Plate Tectonics and Earthquake Storms in the Late Bronze Age Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean"

In light of the accumulated evidence now published, the oft-denigrated suggestion that major earthquakes took place in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean areas during the late 13th and early 12th centuries BC must be reconsidered.A new study of earthquakes occurring in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean region during the 20th century,utilizing data recorded since the invention of seismic tracking devices, shows that this area is criss-crossed with major fault lines and that numerous temblors of magnitude 6·5 (enough to destroy modern buildings, let alone those of antiquity) occur frequently. It can be demonstrated that such major earthquakes often occur in groups, known as‘‘sequences’’ or ‘‘storms’’, in which one large quake is followed days, months, or even years later by others elsewhere on the now-weakened fault line. When a map of the areas in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean region affected (i.e.shaken) by 20th century AD earthquakes of magnitude 6·5 and greater and with an intensity of VII or greater is overlaid on Robert Drews’ map of sites destroyed in these same regions during the so-called ‘‘Catastrophe’’ near the end of the Late Bronze Age, it is readily apparent that virtually all of these LBA sites lie within the affected (‘‘high-shaking’’) areas. While the evidence is not conclusive, based on these new data we would suggest that an ‘‘earthquake storm’’ may have occurred in the Late Bronze Age Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean during the years 1225–1175 BC. This ‘‘storm’’may have interacted with the other forces at work in these areas c. 1200 BC and merits consideration by archaeologists and prehistorians.


https://www.academia.edu/19524810/Poseidons_Horses_Plate_Tectonics_and_Earthquake_Storms
_in_the_Late_Bronze_Age_Aegean_and_Eastern_Mediterranean

Not sure if this has any bearing at all on the missing Dark Ages? As there are plenty of Dark Age locations that are not in earthquack areas.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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This breaks a primary AE rule. We know plenty about earthquakes and nothing so far has come near to destroying even a small civilisation. Not even a city so far. Bits of a city. This is a standard case of one academic discipline trying to earn brownie points by supporting another. Of course if you are allowed to make stuff up, eg

an ‘‘earthquake storm’’ may have occurred in the Late Bronze Age Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean during the years 1225–1175 BC. This ‘‘storm’’may have interacted with the other forces at work in these areas c. 1200 BC and merits consideration by archaeologists and prehistorians.

then anything's possible. Notice that concept of 'an earthquake storm'. Sounds impressive but if you actually read the account it is

It can be demonstrated that such major earthquakes often occur in groups, known as‘‘sequences’’ or ‘‘storms’’, in which one large quake is followed days, months, or even years later by others elsewhere on the now-weakened fault line.

In other words it's what happens all the time, everywhere. Move along, folks, nothing to see here etc etc
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Kinda matches my gut reaction. Some buildings might fall over, but plants and vegetables in the ground and animals in the field just get wobbled a bit. Life goes on.
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aurelius



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This is germane to the thread:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36912700

Australia moves about 7cm north annually because of tectonic movements.


Could there be another explanation, other than 'tectonic movements'?
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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I’ve always regarded geography as one of my stronger subjects, but I was astonished the other day (studying a map of the Middle East) at just how close Pakistan comes to the Arabian Peninsula... It used to be much further away than that!
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I may have mentioned it before but all these movements (possibly bowel in your case, Chad) are to be looked at through AE spectacles. In the first place improvements in measuring techniques have to be eliminated, in the second place shrinkage and expansion of the earth generally have to be eliminated but thirdly....

If it can be done with this degree of accuracy then why haven't geomorphologists covered the earth with sensors and nailed down every single plate as they collide, separate, subduct and do all the other things these will-o'-the-wisps are asked to do? We still haven't got a single one. And the reason is ... drum roll ...
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