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Principles of Applied Epistemology (APPLIED EPISTEMOLOGY)
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Hatty
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Mick Harper wrote:
Three if he's a Lombard.

Wiki says three golden balls are the traditional sign for a pawnbroker's

The pawnbrokers' symbol is three spheres suspended from a bar. The three sphere symbol is attributed to the Medici family of Florence, Italy, owing to its symbolic meaning of Lombard. This refers to the Italian region of Lombardy, where pawn shop banking originated under the name of Lombard banking.



Three bags full?

The account of the Medici golden balls symbol is very reminiscent of Megalithic-style lore, a giant killed with three bags of rocks back in the days of Charlemagne.

The legend claims that a Medici hired Charlemagne to slay a giant using three bags of rocks. From that day forward, the Medici crest used the three balls. Other families adopted the use of the three balls because of the financial success of the Medici family. The gold balls were used throughout the Middle Ages on crests as a symbol of success.

There are several resonances with Hermes (Thrice-great), patron saint of trade, trickery and travel, not to mention banking. We covered the pawnshop association when discussing holding animals 'in hock' and demanding payment for the guide, as in 'Penny for the guy' or ferryman.

There's also the Hermes link to weasel/stoat/ermine. The "Pop goes the weasel!" song refers to pawning one's coat ('weasel and stoat' in rhyming slang). Folklorists say the three golden balls refer to a story about St Nicholas, patron saint of chimneys, pawnbrokers and stockings, who gave a bag of gold each to three young girls so they could afford to get married.
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Mick Harper
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And who else gave bags of gold to young girls?
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Mick Harper
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Rank 32 - this is relevant | irrelevant

Sorry about this but I didn't want to use my own name.
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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I realised this morning that creativity is a mild form of autism. Then I immediately started worrying whether this is an original thought and if not why nobody had thought to tell me. It's a bit depressing knowing that I'm just an ill-informed sicko but luckily the autism means I'm already thinking up ways I can turn this to my advantage. Nothing so far but the depression is swiftly banished. That's the difference between intellectuals and artists. It's a life sentence for them, morning scales for us.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Hatty wrote:
Wiki says three golden balls are the traditional sign for a pawnbroker's

There's also the Hermes link to weasel/stoat/ermine. The "Pop goes the weasel!" song refers to pawning one's coat ('weasel and stoat' in rhyming slang). Folklorists say the three golden balls refer to a story about St Nicholas, patron saint of chimneys, pawnbrokers and stockings, who gave a bag of gold each to three young girls so they could afford to get married.




As Wiley needs to look for a symbols on a coin not folklore. My starting point is a Jewish coin. The three pomegranates. The cycle is Suffering Death Resurrection.....You are short of cash,You pawn for credit, You buy back.
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Hatty
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In: Berkshire
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The three pomegranates. The cycle is Suffering Death Resurrection.....You are short of cash, You pawn for credit, You buy back.

The golden balls sign is a mirror image of the three pomegranates which, unlike the three balls, point upwards. The three golden balls could be seen as a negative symbol but would any business wish to be associated with negativity? There is a story in Greek mythology about Persephone eating pomegranate seeds in the underworld but nevertheless managing to escape, at a price. Not so different from paying a toll or a guide.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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They are labelled on the coin description as pomegranates but maybe they are opium poppy heads?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium
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Hatty
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Why would opium poppies feature on a coin? Katherine of Aragon displayed a crowned pomegranate on her crest, apparently as a symbol of power and, err, fertility. It's not clear whether her badge was a personal ornament or had established Aragonese roots but since her role was to produce a male heir it's likely the pomegranate was a recognised fertility symbol.

I was wondering about the French fleur de lys symbol which might have evolved from three golden balls or be an offshoot as it were of pomegranates.
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Mick Harper
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Wandering down memory lane -- for bookwriting purposes not self-indulgence (on this occasion) -- I came across a very early, possibly the earliest, exposition of the Applied Epistemological method. I found I was immensely brilliant even then https://grahamhancock.com/mostly-barking-harper/
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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This essay changed my life.
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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On the subject of moving rivers, I came here to post this:



I ask you, is this a natural situation?
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Hatty
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Ishmael wrote:
On the subject of moving rivers....

Looks like the Bay of Mexico was a lake before the sea level changed drastically. Are you suggesting all the rivers in the catchment area found their way independently as it were to the shore but were made to change course? Why?
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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Another African lake that needs looking at... Lake Chad.

Lake Chad (French: Lac Tchad) is a historically large, shallow, endorheic lake in Africa

Endorheic lakes are bodies of water that do not flow into the sea.

Chad should be a salt lake.

Endorheic lakes are usually in the interior of a landmass, far from an ocean in areas of relatively low rainfall. The inland water flows into dry watersheds where the water evaporates, leaving a high concentration of minerals and other inflow erosion products. Over time this input of erosion causes the endorheic lake to become saline (a "salt lake").

It complies with all the above criteria... but the waters remain anomalously fresh.

The only conclusion is that it only recently lost its egress to the ocean... and became a convenient desert reservoir of fresh water.
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Ishmael


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Hatty wrote:
Looks like the Bay of Mexico was a lake before the sea level changed drastically. Are you suggesting all the rivers in the catchment area found their way independently as it were to the shore but were made to change course? Why?


That's exactly what I am suggesting.

I first developed this hypothesis when I applied Mick's methodology to the Mississippi river---noting all of the cultural and technical similarities between the peoples that lived there and those that lived in Egypt and Mesopotamia. My suspicion is that, in so far as the Nile and Euphrates are likely to have been engineered, the Mississippi too is likely to have been.

And then we straight-away notice the Amazon.

And by now we are beginning to wonder if any of the world's "longest rivers" are natural at all.
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Ishmael


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Chad wrote:
The only conclusion is that it only recently lost its egress to the ocean... and became a convenient desert reservoir of fresh water.


There is another possibility.

Salt lakes are not produced the way orthodoxy imagines.

I suggest that salt lakes are merely marooned remnants of former oceans (I think I stole this notion from Mick). Endorheic lakes will not get any saltier no matter how many years go by.
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