MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Inventing History : forgery: a great British tradition (British History)
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 128, 129, 130
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Hatty
Site Admin

In: Berkshire
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Like many important men Selden is furnished with a deathbed scene. I didn't know he was that important but most deathbed descriptions are apochryphal which seems to be the case here

Of his deathbed several narratives have been preserved, though none of them seem to be first-hand accounts. One given by Aubrey represents him as refusing to see a clergyman through the persuasion of Hobbes; another, found in the Rawlinson MSS. at the Bodleian, as refusing to receive Hobbes, confessing his sins, and receiving absolution from Archbishop Ussher, and as expressing the wish that he had rather executed the office of a justice of the peace than spent his time in what the world calls learning (Macray, Annals of the Bodleian Library, 2nd edit. p. 110 n.). According to 'Historical Applications and Occasional Meditations, by a Person of Honour' (1670), he was attended by his friends Archbishop Ussher and Dr. Langbaine, and told them that 'at that time he could not recollect any passage out of infinite books and manuscripts he was master of wherein he could rest his soul, save out of the holy scriptures, wherein the most remarkable passage that lay upon his spirit was Titus ii. 11–14.' Selden was buried in the Temple Church 'magnificently' (says Wood), in the presence of all the judges and of other persons of distinction.

Archbishop Ussher is an old acquaintance but Dr Langbaine (Dr of divinity and Keeper of the University Archives) will have to be added to the rogues' gallery

Gerard Langbaine, the elder (1609 – 10 February 1658) was an English academic and clergyman, known as a scholar, royalist, and Provost of Queen's College, Oxford during the siege of the city. Langbaine associated with leading scholars of his time. Ben Jonson gave him a copy of Vossius' Greek Historians, which he annotated and ultimately presented to Ralph Bathurst. He corresponded with John Selden. When James Ussher died in 1656 he left his collections for his Chronologia Sacra to Langbaine, to see them into print.

Langbaine left twenty-one volumes of collections of notes in manuscript to the Bodleian Library.... A detailed description appears in Edward Bernard's Catalogus. According to Anthony Wood, Langbaine worked on catalogues of manuscripts and books in various libraries. In the case of the Bodleian, surviving notes show that Langbaine led a group of two dozen Oxford men who at least planned to divide the library's contents by topic and survey its contents; the interest now in this effort is that the list overlaps strongly with the 'Oxford Club' around John Wilkins at Wadham College, one of the main components which would come to form the Royal Society


The account of Selden's somewhat 'defective' will brings to mind another will, the one of Theodore Besterman, who also left a bequest to Oxford which was contested by his widow (provision in the end had to be made for her)

He appears to have died possessed of considerable property both real and personal, a small part only of which he bequeathed to relatives. By a codicil to his will he left some of his books to the university of Oxford (for so it seems to have been construed, notwithstanding an apparent defect), and others to the College of Physicians; the residue of his library he bequeathed to his executors, of whom Sir Matthew Hale was one, but with a gentle protest against its being sold. These books were offered by the executors to the Inner Temple on terms which were refused, and were subsequently given by them to the Bodleian at Oxford.

According to Ayliffe (State of the University of Oxford, 1714, i. 462), eight chests, containing the registers of abbeys and other manuscripts relating to the history of England, were, after Selden's death, destroyed by fire in the Temple. Nevertheless, about eight thousand volumes, including many manuscripts and a few unique books, and many of much value, reached the Bodleian Library.

It's hard to tell who is passing which documents off as genuine.

The story that Selden on his death-bed caused his papers to be destroyed (told by an anonymous writer in a Bodleian scrap-book) appears to be plainly erroneous, for there exist in the library of Lincoln's Inn five volumes of Selden's manuscripts which are partly in his handwriting and partly in that of various amanuenses. They no doubt came to Sir Matthew Hale as executor of Selden, and they were, together with other manuscripts, bequeathed by him to Lincoln's Inn; they appear to have been bound after they came into the hands of the society.
Send private message
Boreades


In: finity and beyond
View user's profile
Reply with quote

I'm told that many surprising things are still being found in the Bodleian Library.

Mainly as they work their way through the monumental backlog of stock taking and creating digital images of what's in the archive. That was never done properly when they moved 90% of the non-viewable items out of yer actual Bodleian Library in Oxford to the super new top-secret high-security Bodleian Archive.

Which is just off the A361 Highworth Road, behind the Honda UK car factory in Swindon.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

They'll soon have lots of overflow space. Weren't you supposed to recce this place, Borry, when it came up before? Any sightings of Ussher, the Primate of Ireland, in Ireland would be most welcome. I still can't make out whether the Bodleian is a ship of fools, a nest of knaves or a coven of adepts. Prolly just boring old academics. So, a ship of fools then.

Your accounts, Hatty, read as if written by a single dramatist.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

The Megalithic Portal is one of the industry giants. It has a massive membership/ readership/ contributorship. Its founder/leader has just won the Archaeology Book of the Year but that doesn’t make it ‘orthodox’ precisely. It holds court for every kind of fruitcake, the rule being as long as you are interested in ancient stones you are welcome. I, for instance, have been a member for nigh on twenty years and have had two books reviewed by them. They are a very broad and a very tolerant church. Unless you are Harriet Vered who has just been banned. This was the straw that broke the camel’s back

Anne T wrote:
The sign above the viewing window from the cathedral gardens (access through the cloisters) reads:

St Andrew’s Wells
As you look through the window in the wall into the Bishop’s Palace gardens the water running towards you comes from St Andrew’s Well which is one of the springs that rise in the gardens fed by the subterranean streams from the Mendip Hills. From Neolithic times this never ending supply of fresh water attracted settlers and around 700AD King Ina of Wessex founded a Minster church just south of where the present Cathedral now stands. It is dedicated to St Andrew, the first disciple of Jesus. The City of Wells takes its name from the welling up of these springs.

Harriet Vered wrote:
Sorry, Anne, to bother you but would you please give your source for the 'Minster church' said to have been founded by 'King Ina of Wessex'. The archaeology, or rather lack of archaeology, doesn't support such a statement. The excavation led by Warwick Rodwell in 1980 uncovered a Roman mausoleum so the site is certainly pre-Conquest but he and his team found no traces of Ina's alleged Anglo-Saxon minster. Indeed, according to Rodwell, "there is no documentary evidence for this". Wells isn't mentioned in the Domesday Book which one might expect if it was the site of a minster. .

She's a very naughty girl.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

LBGTQ art through the ages

The British Museum is to launch LGBTQ-themed guided tours taking visitors round treasures that include a gender-fluid depiction of a Babylonian deity dating from 1800 BC and the Warren cup, a Roman silver drinking vessel seen as the holy grail of gay history for its scenes of two men making love. [Guardian]

A short tour, I fear. Most deities, including our own, are 'gender-fluid' but if you suggested that meant anything to do with LBGTQ you'd probably get a thunderbolt up your ... for your pains. The Warren Cup is such a blatant modern forgery that even Neil MacGregor, British Museum Director, can scarce hide his exasperation at one of his predecessors shelling out a record £1.2 million for it

We don't know for certain, but it is thought that the Warren Cup was found buried at Bittir, a town a few miles south-west of Jerusalem. How it got to this location is a mystery, but we can make a guess. We can date the making of the cup to around the year 10. About 50 years later, the Roman occupation of Jerusalem sparked tensions between the rulers and the Jewish community, and in AD 66 that exploded and the Jews took back the city by force. There were violent confrontations, and it is thought that our cup may have been buried at this date by the owner fleeing from the fighting.

Hatty, stick this on our list: "Warren purchased the cup in Rome from a dealer in 1911 for £2,000. It was bought in Jerusalem and said to have been found near the city in Battir (ancient Bethther), with coins of the emperor Claudius, possibly buried during the upheavals of the Jewish Revolt. Maria Teresa Marabini Moevs argued on iconographic grounds that the Warren Cup is a modern forgery executed around 1900 to meet the tastes of Edward Perry Warren, the amateur collector who introduced the artifact to the world."

Sounds like he was LBGTQ so maybe it should be included on the tour after all.
Send private message
Grant



View user's profile
Reply with quote

The late, great Brian Sewell was convinced the Warren cup was a fake, largely I think because it was too convenient as a way of demonstrating the tolerance in the classical world.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Did you know the late, great Brian Sewell was a stock car fanatic? Be that as it may, I would back his judgement against anybody in the art establishment. He lived and died on the bread line for a start. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00tjvxc
Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 128, 129, 130

Jump to:  
Page 130 of 130

MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group