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Randomness (Philosophy)
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Wireloop


In: Detroit
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Does true randomness exist or are all seemingly random events simply our lack of knowing all the hidden, causal variables which affect our ability to predict events (effects)?
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Wireloop wrote:
Does true randomness exist or are all seemingly random events simply our lack of knowing all the hidden, causal variables which affect our ability to predict events (effects)?


Hey I don't know.

You toss a coin nine times and each times it lands "heads".

You then decide to bet on the tenth toss.

If you happily bet heads you believe in causal links, or fate, or god.

If you happily bet tails, you are either a trickster (like Wile) or you suffer gambler's fallacy.

If you happily bet heads or tails (coz it don't matter), you believe in randomness. It exists in "your" universe, where you have perfectly "fair" coins, "fair tosses" etc. Unfortunately that probably goes to show your universe is created (not by you) and you are an avatar flipping coins... but hey ho.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Damn, didn't realise it was a rhetorical question.
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Chad


In: Ramsbottom
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I thought this through and came to the inevitable conclusion that there is no such thing as free will.

Not a conclusion I was willing to accept... but one I couldn't deny.
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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are all seemingly random events simply our lack of knowing all the hidden, causal variables which affect our ability to predict events (effects)?


If an event is predictive it can't be random. It might appear random but it is not. These sort of seemingly random but in reality.... just very very difficult to predict events need to be solved somehow.

The solution is now Monte Carlo approaches... that take a truly random selection of very very difficult to predict events.... and then game play these selections out, creating evaluations.

Once the evaluation is created you are on your way.

You use randomness, and IT to solve problems that humans can't.

You can identify an Applied Epistemologist as they always select randomly from a normal bell curve.
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Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
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I have just received a book from an old friend of the AEL, Eric Wargo, on this very topic. At least I think it's on this topic, the book is rather above my pay grade. I am a genius not a savant. Anyway it's called Time Loops and while I can't in all honesty recommend it first hand, I can commend it on general grounds.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Time-Loops-Precognition-Retrocausation-Unconscious/dp/1938398920
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Ishmael


In: Toronto
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Pricey!
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