MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Meetings with Remarkable Forgeries (British History)
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Hatty
Site Admin

In: Berkshire
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Historians appear to take one-offs in their stride. Another ninth-century document mysteriously surfaced in a solicitor's office in Norfolk. It's a charter dated AD 840 purportedly issued by someone called Cuthwulf (Bishop) of Hereford about whom nothing is known

It was found in the office of a legal gentleman, Mr Kent, of Fakenham, in a parcel of comparatively modern writings which had recently come into his possession and there is good reason for assuming it to be an original charter of the ninth century.

Of Bishop Cuthwulf, who makes the donation recorded in the document, no charter has yet been printed.

The provenance could hardly be more apt.
Send private message
Boreades


In: finity and beyond
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Evening all.

Coincidentally (on the theme of stuff being copied), at Sunday School today, the vicar told the grown-ups a salutory tale on the dangers of copying other people's work, and not being careful. It went something like this :

A silly young monk arrives at the monastery. He is assigned to helping the other monks in copying the old canons and laws of the church, by hand. He notices, however, that all of the monks are copying from copies, not from the original manuscript.

So, the new monk goes to the Old Abbot to question this, pointing out that if someone made even a small error in the first copy, it would never be picked up! In fact, that error would be continued in all of the subsequent copies.

The head monk says, "We have been copying from the copies for centuries, but you make a good point, my son." He goes down into the dark caves underneath the monastery where the original manuscripts are held as archives, in a locked vault that hasn't been opened for hundreds of years. Hours go by and nobody sees the Old Abbot.

So, the young monk gets worried and goes down to look for him. He sees him banging his head against the wall and wailing.

"We missed the R! We missed the R! We missed the bloody R!"

His forehead is all bloody and bruised and he is crying uncontrollably. The young monk asks the old Abbot, "What's wrong, father?"

With a choking voice, the old Abbot replies,
"The word was ....CELEBRATE.


Careful how you go.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Interesting concatenation of skinheads and Dr de Hamel in Josephine Livingstone's review in the New Yorker. We'd better watch out what company we keep.
https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-complicated-political-lives-of-medieval-manuscripts

PS Forgeries is in the National Library of Scotland. "It's a raw bricht moonlicht nicht the nicht" (Nietzsche).
Send private message
Hatty
Site Admin

In: Berkshire
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Josephine Livingstone also wrote an article in the New Yorker on various (mis)representations of the green man. It's similarly lucid and has a good background summary of nineteenth-century through to more contemporary fashions. Most of them seem to stem from Frazer's Golden Bough.

But there's an absence of earlier background. The green man carvings are presumably a homage to St Denis, France's patron saint aka Dionysius, god of the vine, no more (or less) Christian than the vine of Jesse. The Abbey of St Denis is credited with kickstarting Gothic architecture so it could be considered remiss if the titular saint wasn't commemorated.

https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-remarkable-persistence-of-the-green-man
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

This review just got posted on Amazon by 'a verifed Kindle purchaser'

This is a brilliant little book that deserves to reach a broader audience. It's charmingly witty, while delivering a well researched set of arguments that only those with a vested interest could fail to accept. If you are by nature open minded, I guarantee you will find yourself nodding in agreement. I found it difficult to put down.

which is odd since it is isn't available on Kindle. Oh well, beggars and choosers and all that.
Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Jump to:  
Page 6 of 6

MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group