MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
The Sweet Track (Megalithic)
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 18, 19, 20
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Hatty
Site Admin

In: Berkshire
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Masonic aprons seem merely ceremonial, perhaps like veils they have esoteric associations of hiding or protecting something secret. Smiths, another important Megalithic occupation, also wear aprons made of leather or hide (hide again).

The giantesses spilling rocks from aprons probably refers to cairns. Often it's the devil who spills rocks. St Radegunde, the most Megalithic of all the 'saints' (literally Big Wheel) also dropped stones though hers seemed more orderly.

Can't remember if it came up in TME but Olwen (= 'white track') was chased by a group of ruffians and as she ran her white flowers dropped from her apron, a reference to wayside markers. Nowadays walkers are guided by white arrows painted on trees.
Send private message
Hatty
Site Admin

In: Berkshire
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Is this the origin of the egg-and-spoon race? Still popular in annual village fetes and school sports days.

Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Archaeologists have stumbled on something that we disclosed in The Megalithic Empire.

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=Forum&file=viewtopic&topic=6301&forum=2&start=0
Send private message
Boreades


In: finity and beyond
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Meanwhile, the Irish are doing something useful with their oldest known roads; mulching them into compost to sell in garden centres.

In 2005, a 3,000 year old Bronze Age wooden road was uncovered in Mayne Bog in Coole, Co Westmeath. Described by An Taisce as “a major, timber-built road of European significance”, this was an archaeological find of huge importance.

According to John Waddell, Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at NUI Galway, the Mayne road (or “Togher”) is, in terms of size, age, and antiquity “truly of European significance and on a par with those preserved in dedicated heritage centres like Wittemoor in Lower Saxony, Flag Fen in Peterborough (UK), and Corlea in County Longford”.

Professor Waddell’s mention of Corlea is interesting. The Corlea Trackway (Bóthar Chorr Liath) is an Iron Age structure near the village of Keenagh in Co Longford. At least a kilometre in length, it was wide enough for two chariots to pass each other side by side and it has been dated to 148BC. Corlea has an interpretive centre which has, for the past 21 years, employed four people seasonally from April to September and, attracting over 5,500 visitors each year, it is now Longford’s leading tourist attraction.

With all of the considerable respect due to Corlea, the find in Westmeath puts Corlea in the ha’penny place. Whereas Corlea is a trackway, the Mayne Togher is a proper road, up to 6 metres wide and 675 metres in length but, An Taisce notes, “it was seen to extend beyond both recorded limits”. Mayne is also a thousand years older than Corlea.

Mayne Bog is worked by Westland Horticulture, which extracts peat from the site. Despite carbon-dating the find to 1200 to 820 BC, the National Monuments Service – for some reason – did not issue a preservation order or record the road in the Register of Historic Monuments. Apart from two minor excavations, no serious archaeological work has been done on the discovery and – crucially – no legal impediment has been put in place to prevent the destruction of Mayne Togher.

For the ten years since the find, Westland Horticulture has – entirely legally – continued to mulch something as old as Newgrange into compost for window boxes. At least 75% of the road is gone now. Dr Pat Wallace – former director of the National Museum of Ireland – has described this as “an international calamity”.


I'm glad to be able to report I'm not guilty of aiding & abbetting by association, because we've not bought any Westland Horticulture compost.

http://avondhupress.ie/centenary-3000-years-irish-history-mulched-potting-compost/
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

It takes a lot to shock me but I am shocked. When I destroy the Book of Kells I will now do it with a gay heart and a lilt in my stride.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

Here's a sweet track in Bohemia with some familiar tropes.
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=44663
Send private message
Boreades


In: finity and beyond
View user's profile
Reply with quote

That reminds me of some Devon lanes, where centuries of heavy farm(?) traffic has worn such a groove in the surface that some parts are c.6ft below the fields on either side.
Send private message
Mick Harper
Site Admin

In: London
View user's profile
Reply with quote

There's a book out called Watling Street: Travels through Britain and its Ever-Present Past. [Can someone read it for me?] But reading the review of it in the Guardian I came across this sentence "It remains one of the great highways of modern Britain, running virtually unbroken from Dover to Anglesey". Can anyone see the oddity of this?
Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 18, 19, 20

Jump to:  
Page 20 of 20

MemberlistThe Library Index  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group