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it might be quiet tonight (Linguistics)
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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All of the AEL Linguistics Department are glued to their TVs, watching Eurovision 2014.

I hasten to add, this is purely in the academic pursuit of knowledge.

Nothing at all to do with girls in skimpy dresses and boys in tight trousers.
Hatty, please do sit down, you're blocking the view.
Mick, have you just eaten all the crisps and pickled onions?

Anyway, what was I saying?
Oh yes, the big question is, why are they nearly all singing in English?

Or, perhaps I should rephrase that.
Why are the ones who are not singing in English doing so?
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Mick Harper
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In: London
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It's an accident of history. You maximise your chances by singing in the language most people understand and that language presently is English. Not just presently, but probably forever. This happened because the previous 'international language', French, in the nineteenth century, lost out to English in the twentieth largely because the Americans (and the Brits) refuse to learn foreign languages and, since they were dominant in many international fields (air traffic control just to give a minor example) everybody else had to learn English.

Then the global economy took off and everybody is now obliged to learn English. The Eastern bloc held out for some time (promoting Russian as the international language) but even they are now fully in line. The only possibility now is if China insists on Chinese when she takes over.

AE says we (English-speakers) should take advantage of this situation by not bothering to learn foreign languages at school. Naturally the education lobby says different, "It broadens/trains the mind." So does studying pornography.
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Mick Harper wrote:
... studying pornography.


Can you get a grant for that?
It's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it.

Or were you watching the Polish Eurovision entry?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJ920cN2HmA#t=54
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Boreades


In: finity and beyond
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Hush please, we're practising our Welsh National Anthem.

Gwlad Gwlad

Have you ever wanted to be able to sing the national anthem of Wales but wouldn't know where to begin? A brand new App by the National Library of Wales and Eto Music Practice Apps is now available that will help you to learn how to pronounce and sing the words of the anthem (and even the alto, tenor or bass parts) while also finding out more about its story.

The bilingual Gwlad Gwlad App has a unique and innovative user interface that will enable its users to pronounce the words and then to learn the anthem's melody slowly to begin and then at the usual speed.


http://www.llgc.org.uk/services/media-business/press-releases/gwlad-gwlad/

Gwlad Gwlad is available to download
from iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/gwlad-gwlad!-national-anthem/id908469898?mt=8
& Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=air.com.wp.welshnationalanthem

Where's me giant leek?
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Wile E. Coyote


In: Arizona
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Boreades wrote:

Oh yes, the big question is, why are they nearly all singing in English?



I am afraid orthodoxy has caught Ishmael up, they now realise that Humans use similar sounds for common words in more than 6,000 languages.

English is of course the language that best approximates to these common sounds. This explains why foreigners have a immediate good grasp of English, yet we struggle with their posh, bastardized, over complicated attempts to communicate. To be fair we did have the advantage of being an island. Once the trees came down uniting the disparate bands roaming the taskscape... in the so called mesolithic.... these earlier sounds were quickly standardised, and the first English words and sentences were expressed.

I will say it again .......Humans use similar sounds for common words ......

Please put my PO in the post Boro.

Ok it did take two years to work out.......

http://www.sciencealert.com/humans-use-similar-sounds-for-common-words-in-more-than-6-000-languages
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